Archives for the month of: May, 2014

 
Here are some facts you may not have known about NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair:

 

#1

He Used To Be A Liberal.
Mulcair was Minister of Sustainable Development, Environment and Parks in Jean Charest’s Liberal government in Quebec. He served in the role from 2003-2006.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Mulcair

 

#2

Mulcair married Catherine Pinhas in 1976. She was born in France to a Turkish family of Sephardic Jewish descent. Mulcair has French citizenship through his marriage, as do the couple’s two sons.

 

#3

Mulcair left Charest’s Liberal government in Quebec after he was offered the position of Minister of Government Services in 2006, an apparent demotion from Minister of the Environment. Mulcair has said his ouster was related to his opposition to a government plan to transfer land in the Mont Orford provincial park to condo developers.

 

#4

Ancestor Was Premier Of Quebec
Mulcair’s great-great-grandfather on his mother’s side was Honoré Mercier, the ninth premier of Quebec.

 

#5

Mulcair was the first New Democrat to win a riding in Quebec during a federal election. He held the riding of Outremont during the 2008 election after first winning the seat in a 2007 by-election. Phil Edmonston was the first New Democrat to win a seat in Quebec, but his win came in a 1990 by-election. Robert Toupin was the very first to bring a Quebec seat to the NDP, but he did it in 1986 by crossing the floor.

 

#6

He’s Half Irish.
Mulcair’s father Harry Donnelly Mulcair was Irish-Canadian and his mother Jeanne French-Canadian. His father spoke to him in English and his mother in French — explaining his fluency in both official languages.

 

#7

He Votes In France.
Muclair has voted in past French elections, but after becoming leader of the Official Opposition he said he would not cast a ballot in the French presidential vote.

 

#8

Young Love At First Sight
Mulcair met his future wife at a wedding when they were both teenagers. Catherine was visiting from France. They married two years later when they were both 21.

 

#9

Mr. Angry
Mulcair was given the moniker in a Maclean’s headline, but the new leader of the NDP has long been known for his short fuse. In 2005, he was fined $95,000 for defamatory comments he made about former PQ minister Yves Duhaime on TV. The comments included French vulgarity and an accusation that alleged influence peddling would land Duhaime in prison.

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
A Vancouver dispensary has installed what it says is Canada’s first vending machine for medical marijuana.

The B.C. Pain Society offers “high-grade” medical pot sealed in tamper-proof, sealed bags and sold in the machine for $50 per half ounce.
 

 
Only members can use the machine.

 
Vending Machine 1
 

Pot vending machines come to Colorado

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Canada created virtually no net new jobs in the six months to April, consumer debt is at an all-time high, retailers are struggling if not disappearing, and the percentage of Canadians with a job remains well below the pre-recession level.

But things are looking much brighter on the corporate side. According to StatsCan, corporate profits in Canada shot up 12.3% in the first quarter of 2014, compared to a year earlier.

By comparison, Canadians’ average weekly earnings, according to another StatsCan report, went up by about a quarter as much; they rose 3.1% during the same period.

The booming profit numbers are “a very encouraging sign for business investment going forward,” TD Bank said this week, but the broader picture is becoming worrisome. We are facing the prospect of a U.S.-style disconnect between Bay Street earnings and the main street economy.

Canada has been losing about 4% of its manufacturing jobs per year since the recession hit. The pace has slowed a bit in the past year, with just 1.8% of manufacturing jobs disappearing in the year to March, 2014. But in that period, manufacturing profits soared a stunning 24.3%.

The six biggest private banks — CIBC, BMO, National Bank, RBC, Scotia and TD — earned unadjusted profits totalling $7.37 billion in the second quarter.

It’s quite similar situation to the U.S. in recent years, where the job market cratered and stayed down, even as corporate profits returned to normal and stock markets began to reach towards record highs.

Great for owners of capital, crappy for everyone else who has to depend on a paycheque for their wealth. It all almost looks like what Thomas Piketty is talking about in his talked-about book Capital in the Twenty-First Century.

Piketty says rising inequality is a natural state in capitalism, because capital accumulates faster than the overall economy grows.

What Canadian banks’ earnings will buy you in the real world:

What banks’ profits will buy you
Canada’s six big banks — BMO, CIBC, National Bank, RBC, Scotia and TD — earned $7.37 billion in profits in just the three months of the second quarter of 2014. That’s an astronomical number that’s hard to imagine, so here’s a breakdown of what that money will buy you in the real world.

89.9 million pairs of Lululemon Luon yoga pants
At Canadian retail price of $82 each.

26.8 million temporary foreign workers
It costs $275 to file an application for the labour market opinion needed to hire a TFW.

18,381 average Canadian homes
The average resale price for a house or condo in Canada in March, 2014, was $401,419.

39 million pairs of Beats by Dre headphones
At $189 Canadian.

2.23 billion Chick-fil-A chicken sandwiches
Average U.S. price of $3.05 translates into $3.30 Canadian at current exchange rates.

32 Boeing 787 Dreamliners
The 787-8 retails for $211.8 million U.S., on the Boeing website, or $229.5 million Canadian.

Enough gas for 18,265 car trips around the world
At the current Toronto average price of $1.36 a litre, bank profits will buy you 5.42 billion litres of gas, enough to drive 732 million kilometres in a late-model Honda Accord.

6 minutes of roaming time at the Big Three telcos
OK, that one’s just a little joke.

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
UNIONS 1
UNIONS 2
Unions 3
Unions 4

 

FLASHPOINTS IN THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN LABOUR

UNIONS 5

Labour Day: A Canadian Invention
Few Canadians realize it, but Labour Day is as Canadian as maple bacon. It all began in 1872, when the Toronto Typographical Union went on strike to demand a nine-hour workday. When Globe and Mail chief George Brown had the protest organizers arrested, Prime Minister John A. Macdonald passed a law legalizing labour unions. Thus, a Conservative prime minister became a hero to the working class, and Canada became among the first countries to limit the workday, doing so decades before the U.S. The typographers’ marches became an annual event, eventually being adopted by the U.S., becoming the modern day Labour Day.

UNIONS 6

The Winnipeg General Strike
The end of World War I brought social instability and economic volatility to Canada. On May 15, 1919, numerous umbrella union groups went out on strike in Winnipeg, grinding the city to a halt. Protesters were attacked in the media with epithets such as “Bolshevik” and “Bohunk,” but resistance from the media and government only strengthened the movement. In June, the mayor ordered the Mounties to ride into the protest, prompting violent clashes and the death of two protesters. After protest leaders were arrested, organizers called off the strike. But the federal mediator ended up ruling in favour of the protesters, establishing the Winnipeg General Strike as the most important strike in Canadian history, and a precursor to the country’s modern labour movement.

UNIONS 7

The Regina Riot
During the Great Depression, the only way for a single male Canadian to get government assistance was to join “relief camps” — make-work projects set up by the federal government out of concern idle young men were a threat to the nation. The relief camps, with their poor work conditions, became breeding grounds for communists and other radicals. The “On-To-Ottawa Trek” was organized as a protest that would move from Vancouver across the country to Ottawa, to bring workers’ grievances to the prime minister. The trek halted in Regina when Prime Minister R.B. Bennett promised to talk to protest organizers. When talks broke down, the RCMP refused to allow the protesters to leave Regina and head for Ottawa, and on June 26, 1935, RCMP riot officers attacked a crowd of protesters. More than 100 people were arrested and two killed — one protester and one officer.

UNIONS 8

Bloody Sunday
In May, 1938, unemployed men led by communist organizers occupied a post office and art gallery in downtown Vancouver, protesting over poor work conditions at government-run Depression-era “relief camps.” In June, the RCMP moved in to clear out the occupiers, using tear gas inside the post office. The protesters inside smashed windows for air and armed themselves with whatever was available. Forty-two people, including five officers, were injured. When word spread of the evacuation, sympathizers marched through the city’s East End, smashing store windows. Further protests against “police terror” would be held in the weeks to come.

UNIONS 9

Giant Mine Bombing
In 1992, workers at Royal Oak Mines’ Giant Mine in the Northwest Territories went on strike. On September 18, a bomb exploded in a mineshaft deep underground, killing nine replacement workers. Mine worker Roger Warren was convicted of nine counts of second-degree murder. The Giant Mine closed in 2004.

UNIONS 10

The Toronto G20
The Canadian Labour Congress, representing numerous labour groups, participated in protests in Toronto during the G20 summit in June, 2010. When a handful of “Black Block” anarchists rioted through the city core, it brought an overwhelming police response that resulted in the largest mass arrests in Canadian history. More than 1,000 people were arrested, with most never charged with any crime. Numerous allegations of police brutality have been made, and the Toronto police are now the target of several multi-million dollar lawsuits. So far, two police officers have been charged with crimes relating to G20 policing, and charges against other police officers are also possible.

UNIONS 11

Occupy Canada
When Vancouver-based magazine Adbusters suggested the public “occupy Wall Street” to protest corporate malfeasance, New Yorkers took the suggestion seriously, and occupied Zuccotti Park in Manhattan. Canadians followed suit, sparking copycat occupations in all major Canadian cities in September, 2011. By December, most of the occupations had been cleared, all of them non-violently. Though the protests achieved no specific goals, they did change the political conversation in North America. What their long-term legacy will be remains to be seen.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Euthanasia In Canada
Here’s a look at the state of Euthanasia laws in Canada and their history.

Suicide Not A Crime
Suicide hasn’t been a crime in Canada since 1972.

Doctor-Assisted Suicide Illegal
Doctor-assisted suicide is illegal, although the ruling of the B.C. Supreme Court will force Parliament to alter the law within one year.

The Criminal Code of Canada states in section 241 that:

“Every one who (a) counsels a person to commit suicide, or (b) aids or abets a person to commit suicide, whether suicide ensues or not, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.”

Passive Euthanasia
Passive euthanasia involves letting a patient die instead of prolonging life with medical measures. Passive euthanasia is legal in Canada.

The decision is left in the hands of family or a designated proxy. Written wishes, including those found in living wills, do not have to be followed by family or a proxy.

Sue Rodriguez
Sue Rodriguez, who suffered from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease), launched a case asking the Supreme Court of Canada to allow her to end her own life on the grounds that the current law discriminated against her disability.

Because suicide is legal in Canada and Rodriguez was unable to end her life because of a lack of mobility, she argued it was discriminatory to prevent her from ending her own life with the aid of another.

The court refused her request in 1993, but one year later she ended her life anyway with the help of an unnamed doctor.

Robert Latimer
Robert Latimer was convicted of second-degree murder in the 1993 death of his severely disabled daughter Tracy. A lack of oxygen during Tracy’s birth led to cerebral palsy and serious mental and physical disabilities, including seizures and the inability to walk or talk. Her father ended Tracy’s life by placing her in his truck and connecting a hose to the vehicle’s exhaust.

The case led to a heated debate over euthanasia in Canada and two Supreme Court challenges.

Latimer was granted day parole in 2008 and full parole in 2010.

Bills To Legalize
Former Bloc Québécois MP Francine Lalonde tried repeatedly to get legislation legalizing euthanasia in Canada passed. Bill C-407 and Bill C-384 were both aimed at making assisted suicide legal. C-384 was defeated in the House 228 to 59, with many Bloc MPs and a handful of members from all other parties voting for the legislation.

Tetraplegic Tory MP Steven Fletcher made the following statement after C-384 was defeated:

“I would like to be recorded as abstaining on this bill. The reason is I believe end of life issues need to be debated more in our country. I believe that life should be the first choice but not the only choice and that we have to ensure that resources and supports are provided to Canadians so that choice is free. I believe, when all is said and done, the individual is ultimately responsible. I want to make this decision for myself, and if I cannot, I want my family to make the decision. I believe most Canadians, or many Canadians, feel the same. As William Henley said in his poem Invictus, “I am the master of my fate: I am the captain of my soul.”

 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Canada’s Best Jobs 2014

Source: Canadian Business

20) Scientific Research Manager
Median Salary: $79,997

Five-Year Wage Growth: -2 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 20 per cent

19) Longshore Worker
Median Salary: $70,720

Five-Year Wage Growth: 30 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 13 per cent

18) Psychologist
Median Salary: $77,875

Five-Year Wage Growth: 18 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 30 per cent

17) School Principal and Administrator
Median Salary: $91,437

Five-Year Wage Growth: 14 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: Eight per cent

16) Registered Nurse
Median Salary: $72,800

Five-Year Wage Growth: 15 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 13 per cent

15) Post-Secondary School Administrator
Median Salary: $81,224

Five-Year Wage Growth: Six per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 25 per cent

14) Government Program Officer
Median Salary: $77,875

Five-Year Wage Growth: 20 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 71 per cent

13) Probation and Parole Officer
Median Salary: $72,946

Five-Year Wage Growth: 12 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 26 per cent

12) Audiologist and Speech-Language Pathologist
Median Salary: $79,040

Five-Year Wage Growth: 14 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 35 per cent

11) Specialized Engineer (ie. Agricultural or Naval)
Median Salary: $79,997

Five-Year Wage Growth: 28 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: Seven per cent

10) Electrical and Telecommunications Coordinator
Median Salary: $72,800

Five-Year Wage Growth: 13 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 28 per cent

9) Financial Administrator
Median Salary: $82,992

Five-Year Wage Growth: 16 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: Eight per cent

8) Social, Community and Correctional Services Manager
Median Salary: $67,600

Five-Year Wage Growth: 27 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 34 per cent

7) Head Nurse and Medical Supervisor
Median Salary: $76,960

Five-Year Wage Growth: 18 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 11 per cent

6) Human Resources Manager
Median Salary: $81,994

Five-Year Wage Growth: 18 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: One per cent

5) Health Care Manager
Median Salary: $87,360

Five-Year Wage Growth: 14 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 15 per cent

4) Primary Production Manager
Median Salary: $110,240

Five-Year Wage Growth: 28 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 32 per cent

3) Oil and Gas Drilling Supervisor
Median Salary: $72,800

Five-Year Wage Growth: 15 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 22 per cent

2) Public Administration Director
Median Salary: $97,074

Five-Year Wage Growth: 21 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 21 per cent

1) Lawyer
Median Salary: $79,997

Five-Year Wage Growth: 14 per cent
Five-Year Job Growth: 29 per cent

The 10 Worst Jobs In Canada

10: Telephone operator
Five-year median wage loss: -7%

Median income: $29,120

Typical job titles: Auxiliary operator, telephone operator, complaints clerk

9: Agricultural specialist
Five-year median wage loss: -8%

Median income: $57,137

Typical job titles: Agrologist, agronomist, farming consultant

8: Textile dyeing/finishing operator
Five-year median wage loss: -9%

Median income: $31,200

Typical job titles: Batch dyer, brushing operator, yarn finisher

7: Chemical products labourer
Five-year median wage loss: -10%

Median income: $28,080

Typical job titles: Acetylene cylinder preparer, electrode cleaner, chemical plant labourer

6: Water transport engineer officer
Five-year median wage loss: -10%

Median income: $58,240

Typical job titles: Tugboat engineer, marine engineer officer, fishing vessel engineer officer

5: Papermaking operator
Five-year median wage loss: -11%

Median income: $50,003

Typical job titles: Paper machine operator, paper maker, back tender

4: Protection worker
Five-year median wage loss: -12%

Median income: $33,280

Typical job titles: Private detective, floorwalker, alarm specialist

3: Fabric manufacturing supervisor
Five-year median wage loss: -13%

Median income: $27,726

Typical job titles: Alterations supervisor, dressmakers supervisor, stitching department supervisor

2: Visual artist
Five-year median wage loss: -19%

Median income: $36,566

Typical job titles: Painter, sculptor, art instructor

1: Electronics manufacturing supervisor
Five-year median wage loss: 19%

Median income: $37,024

 
 

 
 

 
 

 

1. Feds Make Warrantless Requests For Data 1.2 Million Times A Year
According to documents given to Privacy Commissioner Chantal Bernier, the federal government asks telecom for data on subscribers 1.2 million times a year. That’s one request for every 30 Canadians, every year. Most of those requests don’t involve a warrant, and in 2011 telecoms complied with at least 784,000 of those requests.

Canada’s Digital Privacy Act lets companies share customers’ personal info, privacy critics warn
Canadian court documents posted online, via Romania

2. The Feds Buy Their Phones From The NSA
The federal government spent more than $50 million buying high-security communications technology from the U.S. National Security Agency, according to data unearthed by Vice magazine.

There have been at least 73 contracts for telecommunications equipment procured through the NSA over the past decade.

3. Some Of Canada’s Telecoms Have Built Databases Specifically For Police
According to documents given to NDP MP Charmaine Borg under an access to information request, some telecoms are building databases of customer information specifically for police use. A Competition Bureau document noted the bureau had “accessed the Bell Canada Law Enforcement Database” 20 times in 2012-2013.

4. Some Telecoms Are Apparently Giving The Government Access To Everything
At least one Canadian telecom is evidently giving the government unrestricted access to communications on its network, according to documents from Canada’s privacy commissioner. The unnamed telecom says the government has the ability to copy the traffic on its communications network, then mine the copied data to determine what sort it is.

5. The Anti-Cyberbullying Bill Is Really A Pro-Spying Bill
Critics say Bill C-13, the “anti-cyberbullying bill” the Harper government is promoting, is essentially a back-door for a host of measures that would allow greater government intrusion into private lives. The bill would provide legal immunity to telecoms that hand over customer data without a warrant, and would lower the standard under which police can get warrantless data.

Digital rights group OpenMedia says the bill “would let … authorities create detailed profiles of Canadians based on who they talk to and what they say and do online.”

6. The ‘Digital Privacy Act’ Is An Attack On Digital Privacy
Industry Minister James Moore’s Digital Privacy Act is being billed as “protection for Canadians when they surf the web and shop online,” but critics say it amounts to a wholesale threat to the privacy rights it ostensibly aims to enshrine.

Bill S-4 would allow internet service providers to share customer data with any organization that is investigating a possible breach of contract, such as a copyright violation, or illegal activity. Thus, private corporations, and not just the government, could obtain personal information about you.

The bill would also eliminate court oversight of file-sharing lawsuits, which critics fear would lead to the sort of “copyright trolling” seen in the U.S.

7. There’s Pretty Much No Way The NSA Isn’t Spying On Canadians
An estimated 90 per cent of Canadian Internet traffic moves through the U.S., which means that Canadians are being caught up in the NSA’s surveillance dragnet, experts say.

Data passes through “filters and checkpoints” and is “shared with third parties, with law enforcement and of course intelligence agencies that operate in the shadows,” says Ronald Deibert, head of the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab.

8. Canada Probably Has An NSA-Style Program Of Its Own
Documents obtained by the Globe and Mail and The Canadian Press suggest that Canada is engaged in mass warrantless surveillance. The documents show then-Defence Minister Peter MacKay signed a ministerial directive in November, 2011, authorizing the re-start of “a secret electronic eavesdropping program that scours global telephone records and Internet data trails – including those of Canadians – for patterns of suspicious activity.”

9. Stephen Harper Just Doubled The Budget For Electronic Spying
Canada’s electronic spy agency, CSEC, will see its budget skyrocket to $829 million in 2014-15, from $444 million this year.

GOV SPYING 1

10. Canada’s Spies Are Taking Money From The NSA
According to journalist Glenn Greenwald’s book “No Place To Hide,” Canada took some $300,000 to $400,000 from the NSA in 2012 to develop surveillance capabilities. However, that money amounts to a drop in the bucket given CSEC’s $829 million budget for electronic surveillance.

NSA gave Canada at least $300,000 to develop spy program
Snowden document shows Canada set up spy posts for NSA

11. Canada Allowed The NSA To Hack Secure Encryption Keys
The CSEC was in charge of developing an international standard for encryption keys to transmit data securely. But according to documents obtained by the New York Times, CSEC handed over control of the standard to the NSA, allowing the U.S. surveillance agency to build back-doors that allowed it to crack the encryptions. As a result, the NSA was able to crack data transmissions that internet users thought were secure.

12. The U.S. Spied On The Toronto G20 Conference
The Harper government allowed the U.S. to carry out widespread surveillance in Canada during the G20 meeting in Toronto in 2010, according to documents leaked by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Few details of the espionage were released, but it appears this is a sort of rotating circle of spying: Canada helped the U.S. and U.K. spy on the 2009 G20 conference in London.

Glenn Greenwald: U.S. Corporate Media is “Neutered, Impotent and Obsolete”

“Collect It All”: Glenn Greenwald on NSA Bugging Tech Hardware, Economic Espionage & Spying on U.N.

No Place to Hide review – Glenn Greenwald’s compelling account of NSA/GCHQ surveillance
This powerful account of the Edward Snowden case reveals the threat posed by spying.

 

 
 
 
 
 

 

10. Telephone operator
Five-year median wage loss: – 7%
Median income: $29,120
Total employees: 1,700

Typical job titles: Auxiliary operator, telephone operator, complaints clerk

9. Agricultural specialist

Five-year median wage loss: – 8%
Median income: $57,137
Total employees: 3,400

Typical job titles: Agrologist, agronomist, farming consultant

8. Textile dyeing/finishing operator

Five-year median wage loss: – 9%
Median income: $31,200
Total employees: 1,700

Typical job titles: Batch dyer, brushing operator, Yarn finisher

7. Chemical products labourer

Five-year median wage loss: – 10%
Median income: $28,080
Total employees: 9,800

Typical job titles: Acetylene cylinder preparer, electrode cleaner, chemical plant labourer

6. Water transport engineer officer

Five-year median wage loss: – 10%
Median income: $58,240
Total employees: 2,100

Typical job titles: Tugboat engineer, marine engineer officer, fishing vessel engineer officer

5. Papermaking operator

Five-year median wage loss: – 11%
Median income: $50,003
Total employees: 2,300

Typical job titles: Paper machine operator, paper maker, back tender

4. Protection worker

Five-year median wage loss: – 12%
Median income: $33,280
Total employees: 4,100

Typical job titles: Private detective, floorwalker, alarm specialist (Note: Does not include security guards)

3. Fabric manufacturing supervisor

Five-year median wage loss: – 13%
Median income: $27,726
Total employees: 1,800

Typical job titles: Alterations supervisor, dressmakers supervisor, stitching department supervisor

2. Visual artist

Five-year median wage loss: – 19%
Median income: $36,566
Total employees: 1,900

Typical job titles: Painter, sculptor, art instructor

1. Electronics manufacturing supervisor

Five-year median wage loss: – 19%
Median income: $37,024
Total employees: 3,900

Typical job titles: Assembly supervisor, test supervisor, production supervisor

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Change in cost between March 2010 and March 2014, according to Statistics Canada.

10: Apples – up 20%
One kilogram of apples rose 20 per cent to $3.95 since March 2010, when a bag cost $3.30.

9: Wieners – up 21%
A 450-gram pack of wieners spiked 21 per cent to $3.60 in March, up from $2.97 in the same month in 2010.

8: Corn Flakes – up 21%
A 675-gram box of corn flakes jumped 21 per cent from $4.15 in 2010 to $5.02 this March.

7: Eggs – up 22%
The cost of one dozen eggs climbed 22 per cent in the four year span from $2.67 to $3.23.

6: Onions – up 23%
A one kilogram bag of onions rose 23 per cent to $1.93 this March, compared to $1.57 in 2010.

5: Pork chops – up 25%
The price per kilogram of pork chops is up 25 per cent or $2.22 to $11.24 per kilogram.

4: Oranges – up 27%
A one kilogram bag of oranges rose 27 per cent from $2.54 in March 2010 to $3.46 in the same month of this year.

3: Potatoes – up 32%
The cost of a 4.54 kilogram bag of potatoes shot up 32 per cent to $5.59 in March, compared to $4.24 in the same month of 2010.

2: Canned sockeye salmon – up 37%
Prices are up 37 per cent rising from $3.23 per 213 g can in 2010 to $4.44 per can this March.

1: Beef – up to 43%
Prices have risen an average of 27 per cent per kilogram since 2010. Ground beef prices rose the most at 43 per cent per kilogram, followed by strewing beef, with a 39 per cent price hike.

 
 
 
 
 

 

Tar Sands Greenwash: Buying Ads is Easy
 

 
Tar Sands Greenwash: Good News, Bad News
 

 
Tar Sands Greenwash: Greenwash 2.0