Archives for the month of: June, 2014

 
 

Highest-Paying Jobs That Don’t Necessarily Need A Degree In Canada

14: Pilot
Average salary $44,224.00

13: Farmer
Average salary: $46,213.00

12: Secretary
Yes, apparently they still have secretaries.

Average salary: $46,369.00

11: Truck Driver
Average salary: $47,562.00

10: Financial advisor
Average salary: $52,635.00

*Having some sort of certification in finance or business would likely help in this career, but isn’t necessary.

9: Bricklayer
Average salary: $53,017.00

8: Recruiter
Average salary: $54,048.00

*Though a degree isn’t required, you may be at a disadvantage when searching for work as a recruiter against those with degrees in human resources.

7: Mechanic
Average salary: $54,279.00

6: Train driver
Average salary: $56,640.00

5: Human resources manager
Average salary: $58,033.00

*As with recruiters, you my be at a disadvantage in this field against those with a human resources degree.

4: Electrician
Average salary: $62,526.00

3: Electrical engineer
Average salary: $81,349.00

*Adzuna explains: For some electrical engineering jobs, a degree is required, and for others it isn’t — there are alternative professional qualifications.

2: Real estate agent
Average salary: $88,200.00

1: Mining and construction
Average salary: $93,320.00

WHERE ARE THE GRAD JOBS?

Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

Energy / oil and gas – 1,906 jobs
Information technology – 2,559
Consultancy – 3,434
Sales – 3,638
Engineering (best)- 4,968

 

BEST-PAYING DEGREE SUBJECTS

Mechanical engineering – $68,075
Engineering (overall) – $67,036
Electrical engineering – $67,712
Software engineering – $67,274
Civil engineering (best) – $68,356

 

WORST-PAYING GRAD JOBS BY SECTOR

Source: Adzuna

PR, advertising and marketing – $42,209
Social work – $42,204
Human resources and recruitment – $42,195
Sales – $41,463
Creative & design (worst) – $36,805

REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRADUATE JOBS

Manitoba – 28 grads per job
Average starting salary: $45,650.

British Columbia – 20 grads per job
Average starting salary: $45,450.

Saskatchewan – 15.8 grads per job
Average starting salary: $59,059.

Newfoundland – 13.9 grads per job
Average starting salary: $52,620.

Prince Edward Island – 10.6 grads per job
Average starting salary: $36,776.

Alberta – 9.4 grads per job
Average starting salary: $59,957

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Median Income For Women In Canada
The following data comes from Statistics Canada’s 2011 National Household Survey.

St. Catharines — $23,316
Median income for men: $35,028

Average income for women: $29,775
Average income for men: $43,195

Charlottetown — $24,248
Median income for men: $30,961

Average income for women: $31,542
Average income for men: $40,965

Toronto — $24,359
Median income for men: $31,233

Average income for women: $37,015
Average income for men: $52,716

Montreal — $24,361
Median income for men: $32,887

Average income for women: $32,090
Average income for men: $44,800

Vancouver — $24,551
Median income for men: $31,704

Average income for women: $35,618
Average income for men: $50,897

Hamilton — $24,761
Median income for men: $35,666

Average income for women: $32,561
Average income for men: $45,725

Fredericton — $24,990
Median income for men: $34,527

Average income for women: $32,306
Average income for men: $44,772

St. John’s — $25,593
Median income for men: $35,042

Average income for women: $33,940
Average income for men: $48,258

Thunder Bay — $25,741
Median income for men: $37,821

Average income for women: $32,830
Average income for men: $45,148

Winnipeg — $25,923
Median income for men: $35,776

Average income for women: $32,400
Average income for men: $44,342

Halifax — $26,736
Median income for men: $39,154

Average income for women: $33,398
Average income for men: $48,096

Quebec City — $27,053
Median income for men: $36,117

Average income for women: $32,334
Average income for men: $43,858

Victoria — $27,324
Median income for men: $34,235

Average income for women: $33,792
Average income for men: $42,084

Saskatoon — $28,069
Median income for men: $40,913

Average income for women: $35,426
Average income for men: $52,018

Edmonton — $28,460
Median income for men: $43,929

Average income for women: $37,100
Average income for men: $56,034

Calgary — $30,516
Median income for men: $45,781

Average income for women: $41,438
Average income for men: $68,928

Regina — $31,349
Median income for men: $42,006

Average income for women: $38,488
Average income for men: $53,324

Ottawa — $33,728
Median income for men: $46,513

Average income for women: $41,857
Average income for men: $58,318

Whitehorse — $40,702
Median income for men: $46,265

Average income for women: $45,636
Average income for men: $53,264

Yellowknife — $51,951
Median income for men: $66,153

Average income for women: $56,064
Average income for men: $73,225

Iqaluit — $57,897
Median income for men: $62,187

Average income for women: $63,456
Average income for men: $69,539

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Hamilton — 13.2%
Greater Sudbury — 13.4%
Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo — 13.8%
Ottawa-Gatineau (Ontario) — 14.6%
Guelph — 14.8%
Thunder Bay (in 2009) — 15.3%
Barrie — 16.6%
St. Catharines-Niagara — 17.8
Toronto — 18.1%
Peterborough — 18.4%
Kingston — 18.9%
London — 20.3%
Brantford — 20.5%
Oshawa — 21.8%
Windsor — 24.7%

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Earning a spot in cabinet is an honour and privilege for any federal or provincial politician.

But as more and more governments focus on belt-tightening, some are questioning just how bloated the team surrounding a leader needs to be.

Here’s how big cabinets are in different governments across the country (including the prime minister and premiers).

Federal Cabinet
Members: 39 (including Prime Minister Stephen Harper)

Thirty-nine of Harper’s 160 Conservative MPs (or about 24 per cent) currently sit in cabinet.

Ontario Cabinet (Liberal)
Members: 27

Total number of Liberal MPPs: 58 (of 107)

Percentage of Liberal MPPs in cabinet: 46.5%

Est. provincial population: 13,537,994

Quebec Cabinet (Liberals)
Members: 27

Total number of Liberal MNAs: 70 (of 125)

Percentage of Liberal MNAs in cabinet: 38.5%

Est. provincial population: 8,013,000

British Columbia Cabinet (Liberals)
Members: 20

Total number of Liberal MLAs: 49 (of 85)

Percentage of Liberal MLAs in cabinet: 40.8%

Est. provincial population: 4,610,000

Manitoba Cabinet (NDP)
Members: 19

Total number of NDP MLAs: 36 (of 57)

Percentage of NDP MLAs in cabinet: 52.7%

Est provincial population: 1,208,268

Saskatchewan Cabinet (Sask. Party)
Members: 18

Total number of Sask. Party MLAs: 49 (of 58)

Percentage of Sask. Party in cabinet: 36.7%

Est. provincial population: 1,122,588

New Brunswick Cabinet (Progressive Conservatives)
Members: 18

Total number of PC MLAs: 41 (of 55)

Percentage of PC MLAs in cabinet: 43.9%

Est. provincial population: 755,464

Alberta Cabinet (Progressive Conservatives)
Members: 17

Total number of PC MLAs: 58 (of 87)

Percentage of PC MLAs in cabinet: 29.3%

Est. provincial population: 4,025,074

Nova Scotia Cabinet (Liberals)
Members: 16

Total number of Liberal MLAs: 33 (of 51)

Percentage of Liberal MLAs in cabinet: 48.5%

Est. provincial population: 940,789

Newfoundland and Labrador Cabinet (Progressive Conservatives)
Members: 15

Total number of PC MLAs: 33 (of 48)

Percentage of PC MLAs in cabinet: 45.4%

Est. provincial population: 525,378

Prince Edward Island Cabinet (Liberals)
Members: 11

Total number of Liberal MLAs: 23 (of 27)

Percentage of Liberal MLAs in cabinet: 47.8%

Provincial population: 145,855

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

There was little doubt the federal government would approve the Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project, regardless of public opposition or evidence presented against it. The prime minister indicated he wanted the pipeline built before the Joint Review Panel hearings even began. Ad campaigns, opponents demonized as foreign-funded radicals, gutted environmental laws and new pipeline and tanker regulations designed in part to mollify the B.C. government made the federal position even more clear.

Northern Gateway pipeline approved with 209 conditions
Radicals working against oilsands, Ottawa says

Is that how it is?   When the government is wrong, and you voice your criticisms, the government labels you a “radical”.

 
According to an Angus Reid poll conducted after the announcement:
37% agree with the decision,
34% see it as the wrong move, and
29% aren’t sure yet.

However, nearly 70% told the polling firm they believe the project will be completed, regardless of their views of the matter.

This is defeatist.

 
Will this pipeline be built?   The lawsuits will begin. The will cost the taxpayers millions. I think it’s going to go to the ballot box in 2015. It may be their political demise.

 
Introducing the Enbridge 21 :
ENBRIDGE 21 A

These federal MPs have a choice: BC or Enbridge.

Urge them to choose BC at enbridge21@.ca

Let B.C.’s federal government MPs know you don’t support Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline
http://action2.davidsuzuki.org/northern-gateway

 
Clean up the tar sands:

We need a clean energy strategy for Canada.

Stop tar sands expansion.
Implement readily available solutions for existing problems.
Develop a strategy to phase out tar sands development altogether,
as a part of a clean energy strategy for Canada.

We need to reduce demand for oil.

More tar sands oil is not the answer to our energy problem.

The main driver of tar sands expansion is our over-reliance on increasingly dirty oil as a primary source of energy. Rather than tripling tar sands production over the next 17 years, the most rational approach to meeting our energy needs is to reduce our dependence on oil and other fossil fuels by building a clean energy economy based on energy efficiency and low-carbon, renewable energy sources.

But in order for energy efficiency to become the rule rather than exception, it’s essential that effective government policy drives investment in efficiency rather than more dirty oil production.

Every year, the Canadian government gives more than $1.4 billion in tax subsidies to oil, coal, and gas companies.

What is the amount of subsidies for renewable energies?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

  #1   Thomas Mulcair
  #2   Megan Leslie
  #3   Craig Scott
  #4   Pierre-Luc Dusseault
  #5   Rathika Sitsabaiesan
  #6   Dany Morin
  #7   Matthew Dubé
  #8   Lysane Blanchette-Lamothe
  #9   Alexandre Boulerice
#10   Françoise Boivin
#11   Guy Caron
#12   Malcolm Allen
#13   Robert Chisholm
#14   Ryan Cleary
#15   Mylène Freeman
#16   Christine Moore
#17   Philip Toone
#18   Jamie Nicholls
#19   Claude Gravelle
#20   Carol Hughes
#21   François Pilon
#22   Sadia Groguhe
#23   Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet

NDP 1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

“Un-parliamentary Language”
Trudeau channelled his father during an outburst in the House of Commons in December 2011.

During question period, then-Environment Minister Peter Kent responded to NDP MP Megan Leslie’s questions about Canada’s withdrawal from the Kyoto Protocol by saying she should have been at the UN climate change conference in Durban, South Africa. Kent sat down to roars from the opposition, who were outraged that Leslie couldn’t have known what went on in Durban because non-government MPs weren’t allowed to be part of the delegation.

Trudeau took it one step further, yelling out that Kent was a “piece of sh–.”

He apologized right away, calling his language “most decidedly un-parliamentary”.

Justin Trudeau apologizes for swearing at Kent
Justin Trudeau hurls obscenity at Peter Kent in Commons

Fuel For Conservative Albertans?
Trudeau apologized in 2012 for comments he made two years earlier to a Quebec television program in which he appeared to blame Albertans for Canada’s economic woes.

Canada wasn’t doing well because “it’s Albertans who control our community and socio-democratic agenda,” he told a Télé-Québec program in 2010.

Trudeau backtracked when Sun News republished his words, saying the comments were aimed at Prime Minister Stephen Harper and not all Alberta residents.

But the remark certainly didn’t help Liberals in a Calgary Centre byelection, which was won narrowly by the Tories.

“Root Causes” Of Boston Marathon Bombings
In what some consider a gaffe, Trudeau implored the public to look at the ‘root causes’ of terrorism after the Boston Marathon bombings in April 2013.

“Now, we don’t know now if it was terrorism or a single crazy or a domestic issue or a foreign issue.

“But there is no question that this happened because there is someone who feels completely excluded. Completely at war with innocents. At war with a society. And our approach has to be, where do those tensions come from?”

In response, Prime Minister Stephen Harper attacked Trudeau’s “rationalizing” of the violence and said the right course of action was to find the perpetrators as fast as possible.

Don’t ‘sit around trying to rationalize it’: Harper slams Trudeau for response to Boston bombing
Justin Trudeau has shifted the Canadian political landscape: Tim Harper
Justin Trudeau’s celebrity status harder to attack: Tim Harper

He Has A “Level of Admiration” For China
Trudeau again came under fire for a comment he made about China’s “dictatorship.”

At a widely-criticized Toronto fundraiser geared towards female voters, an audience member asked Trudeau which country’s administration he admired the most. He responded by saying that he had a “level of admiration” for China.

“Their basic dictatorship is allowing them to actually turn their economy around on a dime and say we need to go green, we need to start, you know, investing in solar. There is a flexibility that I know Stephen Harper must dream about: having a dictatorship where you can do whatever you wanted, that I find quite interesting.”

He seemed to be aware of how opponents would spin his comments, saying he knows right-leaning Sun News would report that he “prefers China”.

Both the NDP and the Conservatives jumped on Trudeau’s comments, with the NDP even comparing him to U.S. Republican politician Sarah Palin.

At Toronto fundraiser, Justin Trudeau seemingly admires China’s ‘basic dictatorship’

Hockey Joke About Ukraine
During an interview in February on Radio-Canada program Tout le monde en parle that took place while thousands were protesting in Ukraine, the Liberal leader compared the situation in eastern Europe to Russia losing in Olympic hockey.

“Canada should do more,” Trudeau said in response to an interviewer’s question about our country’s role in Ukraine. “President Yanukovych has been made illegitimate. It’s very worrying, especially because Russia lost in hockey, they’ll be in a bad mood. We fear Russia’s involvement in Ukraine.”

He later apologized, but told reporters he thinks Canadians appreciate politicians who aren’t “tightly scripted”.

Will It, Justin? Will It?
Trudeau faced some criticism, while others agreed with him, for comments he made on CPAC in February about the 2014 federal budget, in which he claimed that “the budget will balance itself” if economic growth were greater.

The clip can be viewed at the 27:35 minute mark here. Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, along with Sun News, mocked Trudeau’s comments, but writer Mike Moffatt pointed out in Maclean’s that both Flaherty and Harper have made essentially the same point in the past.

Finance Minister Jim Flaherty talks budgets – and leprechauns

Justin Trudeau’s ‘ladies night’ furor just bluster by Conservatives, says Liberal leader
A Liberal party fundraiser with Justin Trudeau is being called disrespectful toward women.

Outrage over ‘patronizing’, ‘sexist’ Trudeau fundraising event

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Kathleen Wynne was hoping Ontario voters can look past these five scandals when they cast their ballots on June 12.

and Ontario voters did.

Here are the 5 scandals:

Ornge
Ontario’s publicly funded air ambulance service has been under fire for almost two years over sky-high salaries, financial irregularities and corruption allegations. A legislative committee has been probing the service’s complex structures and pay scales in detail, and opposition parties have been alleging wrongdoing with nearly every revelation. The auditor general has criticized the governing Liberals for failing to oversee Ornge, despite giving it $730 million over five years and allowing it to borrow another $300 million. The Liberals insist Ornge went rogue with a web of for-profit companies and questionable business deals, as well as exorbitant salaries and lavish expenses.

Cancelled Gas Plants
Scandal has swirled around the government’s decision to cancel the construction of two Toronto-area gas plants ahead of the 2011 election, in which the government then led by Dalton McGuinty was reduced to minority status. The cancellation costs have now been pegged at $1.1 billion, but opposition parties have accused the Liberals of actively trying to cover up that figure. Ontario’s privacy commissioner has concluded that staff working for McGuinty and a former energy minister broke the law by deleting emails pertaining to the project. Ontario Provincial Police are also investigating the document deletions, seizing government computers at both Queen’s Park and beyond.

eHealth
The provincial agency was given a $1-billion budget to develop electronic health records, but wound up building themselves a bad reputation. A lot of the eHealth money went for untendered contracts given to highly paid consultants who then billed taxpayers for additional expenses in a scandal that cost former health minister David Caplan his job. In 2009, the auditor general said the agency had very little progress to show for its efforts, and opposition parties have alleged further financial mismanagement since then.

Windsor Parkway
The government has taken heat for not immediately acting when it learned a $1.4-billion infrastructure project didn’t live up to safety standards. The Liberals were told that questionable materials were being used on the support beams on Windsor’s Herb Gray Parkway in December 2012, but didn’t halt the project until July. More than 500 support beams are being replaced by the project overseer at no cost to the tax payers, but the NDP has accused the Wynne government of trying to cover up the affair and only backing down when threatened with media exposure.

PanAm Games
Premier Kathleen Wynne has hailed the 2015 games as a cause for celebration, but opposition parties call it just another scandal. The $1.4-billion budget for the games does not include some key expenses, like the $700 million athletes’ village. The government has also come under fire for $7 million worth of bonuses paid out to 64 executives.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Northern Gateway President John Carruthers
(Sept. 4) – Northern Gateway president John Carruthers argues the pipeline is just as important to Canada as the St. Lawrence Seaway and the Canadian Pacific Railway…“when constructed, [they] laid the foundation for significant benefits for generations of Canadians. Our project is no different.”

PIPELINE 1

Robert Mansell, U of C School of Public Policy
(Sept. 4) – Robert Mansell, academic director of the University of Calgary School of Public Policy, argued the benefits the pipeline could have for Canada. “Just imagine a situation where, if not for Northern Gateway, you had shut in 525,000 barrels per day for one year. That loss works out to $40-million a day, or $14.4-billion per year,” he said.

Leanne Chahley, lawyer for the Alta. Federation of Labour
(Sept. 4) – Leanne Chahley, a lawyer for the Alberta Federation of Labour, questioned the estimated economic gains. “It’s still a social science that you’re involved in, economics. How much degree of certainty should we give it?”

PIPELINE 2

Gil McGowan, Alta. Federation of Labour President
(Sept. 4 ) – Albert a Federation of Labour argues the $6-billion line would mean 5% less refinery in Alberta and the loss of 8,000 jobs. “China is in the midst of a building boom in terms of refineries and refining capacity, so our fear is that if our policymakers allow this pipeline to be built we’ll end up in a situation where our own homegrown refineries are no longer economic and they’ll close down,” federation president Gil McGowan said.
“We’ll end up in a situation where we’re sending our raw bitumen oil to China and then buying back the refined product.”

John Carruthers, Northern Gateway President
(Sept. 4) – Northern Gateway president John Carruthers on the Enbridge’s committment to environmental responsibility: “It involves assessing, in the same objective fashion, and according to the same standards, the information or evidence that has been presented by those who are opposed to the development of our project. And it culminates in approving the project under a framework of conditions that will promote reconciliation over division, and fact over rhetoric.”

John Risdale, B.C. First Nations Chief
(May 2012) – B.C. First Nations leaders travel to the step of the Alberta Legislature to voice their concerns on the environmental damage. “The pipeline route that they have proposed is following the most major river system that we have and when the river is ruined, the people are ruined, the land is ruined,” said Hereditary Chief John Ridsdale of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation.

Terry Lake, B.C. Environment Minister
(Sept. 4) – B.C. Environment Minister Terry Lake on how Enbridge plans to exceed world standards in spill prevention. “We certainly want to clarify with Enbridge some of the comments made over $500-million more of safety improvements and what exactly will that mean,” Lake says. “In terms of monitoring, in terms of response capability, how can we ensure that any proponent would have to live up to what we consider world class response and mitigation measures.”

PIPELINE 3

Economist Robert Mansell, U Of C School Of Public Policy
(Sept. 5) – On the chance that the proposed Nothern Gateway pipeline would have a negative effect on central Canada’s manufacturing sector: “It is not credible that one could argue this would cause Dutch disease.”

“Would it do, as has been alleged — cause the rate of inflation to go up and then force the monetary authorities to tighten the money supply and thereby shrink the economy? The answer is no.

“Monetary policy is based on what’s called the Core Inflation Rate, which excludes the price of food and energy.”

Texas-Based Energy Consultant Muse Stancil
(Sept. 5) – In a report submitted to the hearing, Texas-based energy consultant Muse Stancil said the Northern Gateway will have an effect on oil pricing in North America: “It can be expected to have a material effect on the distribution patterns and pricing dynamics for Western Canadian crude, as crude producers for the first time will have a high-volume alternative to their historical markets within North America,” said the Muse Stancil report.

“Northern Gateway allows the Canadian crude producers to both stop selling to their least attractive refiner clients (from a pricing prospective) and reduces their need to ship heavy crude via comparatively expensive rail transport.”

Richard Johnston, UBC Political Scientist
Sept. 5 – On the chance the federtal Tories could lose ground in B.C. due to unfriendly policies such as support of pipelines to the west coast: “Among the risks to their base, I would put Northern Gateway highest,” Johnston said.

“The risk/benefit ratio (for B.C.) is massively unfavourable in itself and if the government were to force the issue pre-emptively, they would add an additional dimension to the debate, singling out one province for ill-treatment, rather like the NEP and Alberta. I expect Conservative MPs are worrying about this aloud.”

Elisabeth Graff, B.C. government lawyer
(Sept. 7) – “Are you willing to acknowledge this is a complex organizational structure that limits the liability of a corporate giant that definitely would have sufficient funds?” she asked. “What we’re left with is an entity which you tell us has the financial resources necessary to cover any type of spill, but we’re still doubting whether that is possible.”

“No, I just fundamentally can’t accept that,” replied Mr. Carruthers.

“Because of the investment, everyone would want to make sure there’s proper funding available in case of a spill,” he said.

Janet Holder, Enbridge senior executive
(Sept. 7) – “We’re doing everything in our power to mitigate against a spill.”

“Believe me, Enbridge doesn’t want a spill. It’s not what we’re in the business for. We’re in the business of moving very safely, environmentally sound and in a sustainable way, product from one spot to another.”

Geoff Plant, B.C.’s head lawyer for the hearings
(Sept. 7) – “The question [is] whether Enbridge is actually capable of getting the kind of insurance to ensure against the risk of liability,” on whether the insurance is there should an oil spill happen.

Barry Robinson, lawyer for three environmental organizations
(Sept. 8) – “If free market economies aren’t at play, where’s the economic benefit?” asked Robinson about the economic effects of the hypothetical possibility of Chinese interests buying control of the Northern Gateway pipeline.

Kelowna resident James MacGregor
(Spet. 6) – The Avaaz petition No Enbridge Tankers/Pipeline in BC Great Bear Rainforest was started by James MacGregor and has since passed 10,000 signatures.

“BC’s entire Great Bear Rainforest, its wildlife and the livelihoods of coastal First Nations are all at great risk if Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline is approved,” he said.

“I know I’m not the only one out there speaking up about the pipeline, but I felt like I couldn’t sit back and do nothing.”

Source: Vancouver Observer

Hana Boye, lawyer for Haisla First Nation
(Sept. 17) – On who could end up with ownership stakes: “If we don’t know who these investors are, we’re not able to determine if they’re financially viable, if they’re market-force driven or if it’s in the interest of Canadians,” she said.

Crystal Lake pipeline

Chris Peters, Engineer
(Sept. 17)- Peters argues that an approval of the pipeline might mean a setback to Canada’s national climate change policy aims to reduce such emissions to by 2020. That cost “should be recorded as a negative and a cost to the planet,” said Peters.

trenton falls pipeline

Terry Lake, B.C. Environment Minister
(Sept. 17) – In the worry that in the event of a spill, Enbridge won’t have tge insurance to cover the clean-up costs: “Enbridge and Northern Gateway are very aware of that concern now, so we’ll look to their response. But we’ve made it clear that taxpayers will not be left on the hook,” Lake said.

“I think that the company would argue they have the resources necessary. What British Columbians want to see is an ironclad guarantee that they do have the resources necessary, that the structure and the insurance in place will protect British Columbians from the cost of any adverse event,” he added.

PIPELINE 4

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Canadian Business looked at how much tax some of Canada’s biggest companies pay. By exploiting government loopholes, some of these companies have managed to pay close to no taxes.

TAX AVOIDANCE 1
First Capital Realty
First Capital Realty owns and manages retail spaces across Canada.
More on this company from Canadian Business.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $1,791

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $22

Canadian Pacific Railway
CP Rail is one of Canada’s largest rail companies. Find out why it’s paying so little in tax.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $7,726

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $139

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 1.80%

MTS
MTS is one of the largest telecom providers in Manitoba. How did this company dodge the tax man?

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $2,420

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $100

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 4.14%

BCE
BCE is a significant player in cable, telecommunications and media.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $29,527

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $1,338

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 4.53%

Gildan
Gildan manufactures clothing like t-shirts, underwear and sportswear. Read more about the company.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $1,543

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $85

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 5.52%

MacDonald Dettwiler & Associates Ltd
MD & A is a leading Canadian aerospace company.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $1,073

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $111

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 10.30%

Brookfield Asset Management
Brookfield is one of Canada’s largest landlords and has significant properties in Canada and abroad. Read CB’s investigation on their tax practices.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $10,471

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $1,350

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 12.89%

Canadian Natural Resources
CNR is a oil and natural gas producer in Canada and abroad.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $30,960

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $4,204

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 13.58%

Enbridge
Enbridge is an energy company specializing in transportation of oil and natural gas.

Net income before taxes (Last 10 years, in millions): $12,117

Tax paid in cash (Last 10 years, in millions): $1,725

Percentage of income paid in taxes (Last 10 years): 14.24%

Read More
Go to Canadian Business for more on corporate taxes.