Archives for the month of: June, 2014

 
Change in cost between March 2010 and March 2014, according to Statistics Canada.

10:   Apples   –   up 20%
One kilogram of apples rose 20 per cent to $3.95 since March 2010, when a bag cost $3.30.

9:   Wieners   –   up 21%
A 450-gram pack of wieners spiked 21 per cent to $3.60 in March, up from $2.97 in the same month in 2010.

8:   Corn Flakes   –   up 21%
A 675-gram box of corn flakes jumped 21 per cent from $4.15 in 2010 to $5.02 this March.

7:   Eggs   –   up 22%
The cost of one dozen eggs climbed 22 per cent in the four year span from $2.67 to $3.23.

6:   Onions   –   up 23%
A one kilogram bag of onions rose 23 per cent to $1.93 this March, compared to $1.57 in 2010.

5:   Pork chops   –   up 25%
The price per kilogram of pork chops is up 25 per cent or $2.22 to $11.24 per kilogram.

4:   Oranges   –   up 27%
A one kilogram bag of oranges rose 27 per cent from $2.54 in March 2010 to $3.46 in the same month of this year.

3:   Potatoes   –   up 32%
The cost of a 4.54 kilogram bag of potatoes shot up 32 per cent to $5.59 in March, compared to $4.24 in the same month of 2010.

2:   Canned sockeye salmon   –   up 37%
Prices are up 37 per cent rising from $3.23 per 213 g can in 2010 to $4.44 per can this March.

1:   Beef   –   up to 43%
Prices have risen an average of 27 per cent per kilogram since 2010. Ground beef prices rose the most at 43 per cent per kilogram, followed by strewing beef, with a 39 per cent price hike.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Want to see the earning potential of certain occupations in Alberta?
Read the list for average hourly pay and salaries for 30 common jobs.

Hotel Managers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   42.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $24.24
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $52,207.0

Aerospace Engineer
Average Hours Worked (per week):   37.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $54.82
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $106,900.00

Ambulance Attendants
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $30.35
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $65,436.00

Architects
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $38.79
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,693.00

Bartenders
Average Hours Worked (per week):   28.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $11.37
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $17,164.00

Bricklayers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $40.37
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $84,525.00

Civil Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $46.11
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $92,054.00

Social Workers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   32.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $40.24
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $67,175.00

Police Officers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $72.06
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $147,745.00

Computer Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $44.86
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $88,975.00

Mechanic Trades
Average Hours Worked (per week):   41.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $36.08
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,076.00

Corrections Officers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $31.40
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $63,285.00

Crane Operators
Average Hours Worked (per week):   42.9
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $35.90
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $80,626.00

Drillers and Blasters For Surface Mining
Average Hours Worked (per week):   62.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $33.04
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $94,475.00

Elementary School Teachers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   34.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $42.98
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $74,679.00

Farmers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $23.72
Overall Average Salary (annual)*, Alberta:   $55,776.00

Executive Assistants
Average Hours Worked (per week):   37.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $32.59
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $62,411.00

Geologists, Geochemists and Geophysicists
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $56.11
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $114,137.00

Heavy Equipment Operators
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.1
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $31.92
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,543.00

Janitors
Average Hours Worked (per week):   33.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $18.45
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $33,370.00

Librarians
Average Hours Worked (per week):   35
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $32.77
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $62,039.00

Ministers of Religion
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $28.82
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $57,168.00

Oil and Gas Well Drillers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $34.94
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $90,511.00

Pharmacists
Average Hours Worked (per week):   36.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $49.49
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $92,677.00

Petroleum Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $52.41
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $107,484.00

Nurses
Average Hours Worked (per week):   28.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $42.60
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $63,922.00

Human Resources Specialist
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.4
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $37.71
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $75,443.00

Taxi Drivers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $16.21
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $31,788.00

University Professors
Average Hours Worked (per week):   44.1
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $56.92
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $122,805.00

 

The highest paying jobs in the Alberta oil patch :

 

21. Occupational Health and Safety Advisor and Officer
a. Occupational health and safety advisors facilitate the development, implementation and maintenance of workplace safety programs.
Occupational Health and Safety Officer
b. Occupational health and safety officers visit places of employment to detect unsafe or unhealthy working conditions, and ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing workplace safety.
According to the provincial government, on average, they make as much as $75,129 per year.

20. Land Surveyor
Land surveyors plan, direct and conduct legal surveys to determine and interpret the location of boundaries, buildings, structures and other natural or human-made features on, over or under the surface of the earth.
According to the provincial government, on average, they make as much as $79,097 per year.

19. Manufacturing Engineer
Manufacturing engineers design, implement, direct and co-ordinate manufacturing system materials and processes to achieve the most efficient, cost effective and high quality production possible in a safe and environmentally responsible manner.
Also Known As: Engineer, Logistics Manager, Professional Engineer
On average, they start around $80,547 per year.

18. Industrial Engineer
Industrial engineers determine the most effective ways for an organization to use its basic resources: people, machines, materials, money and time.
Also Known As: Engineer, Logistics Manager, Professional Engineer
According to the government, they make an average of $80,547 per year.

17. Power Engineer
Power engineers supervise, operate and maintain machinery and boilers that provide steam, power, heat, refrigeration and other utility services to industrial and commercial facilities.
On average, they make as much as $80,735 per year.

16. Refinery and Upgrader Process Operator
Refinery and upgrader process operators are responsible for the day to day operations of oil refineries and upgraders.
Also Known As: Bitumen Extraction Plant Operator, Bitumen Upgrading Plant Operator, Oil Refinery Process Operator, Upgrader Process Operator
On average, they can earn as much as $81,339 per year.

15. Oil Pipeline Operators and Maintenance Workers
Oil pipeline operators and maintenance workers monitor and conduct the day to day operations of oil pipelines and associated facilities.
Also Known As: Equipment Operator, Gauger, Tank Farm Operator.
They can make, on average, as much as $81,339 per year.

14. Oil Pipeline Control Centre Operator
Oil pipeline control centre operators use sophisticated computerized equipment to monitor and control pipeline activities for large regions (for example, all of Alberta and British Columbia) from one centralized control centre.
On average, they can make as much as $81,339 per year.

13. Gas Plant Operator
Gas plant operators control automated processes that convert raw natural gas into forms that can be used by consumers.
On average, they can make as much as $81,339 per year.

12. Gas Pipeline Operators and Maintenance Workers
Gas pipeline operators and maintenance workers monitor the day to day operations of meter and compressor stations essential to the distribution and smooth flow of gas through pipelines.
Also Known As: Control Room Operator, Gas Compressor Operator
They can make on average $81,339 per year.

11. Oil and Gas Production Accountant
Oil and gas production accountants track and analyze production data, calculate revenue and royalties associated with properties owned by oil companies, and ensure reporting requirements are met.
On average, they make as much as $81,135 per year.

10. Field Production Operator
Field production operators are responsible for the initial separation processes or the special treatment required to ensure that impurities such as water, gas and sediments are removed from oil and gas in the field. Once separated, the oil or gas is transported by pipeline to refineries, gas plants or markets.
On average they make $81,622 per year.

9. Chemical Engineer
Chemical engineers conduct research; develop and optimize processes; design and select equipment; and provide technical and management services for plants that convert raw materials into a wide range of end products (for example, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, food products, fuels, plastics, metals).
Can make on average $103,425 per year.

8. Petroleum Engineer
Petroleum engineers are involved in the exploration and development of oil and gas. They apply the principles of geology, physics, chemistry and engineering sciences to the recovery of petroleum and natural gas from conventional reservoirs and oil sands.
Average salary per year is $106,000.

7. Hydrologist
Hydrologists study the occurrence, distribution, circulation and properties of water in the atmosphere, on the Earth’s surface, and in soil and underlying rocks.
On average, they make as much as $110,747 per year.

6. Geologist
Geologists apply their knowledge of the Earth’s crust in exploring for minerals and hydrocarbons (for example, oil and gas), developing resources for production, building engineering foundations and stable slopes, and finding and evaluating ground water supplies. They make an average of $110,747 per year.

5. Exploration Geophysicist
Geophysicists use the principles of physics, mathematics and geology to study the surface and internal composition of the earth. Exploration geophysicists look for oil, natural gas, water and minerals for commercial and environmental projects.
On Average, they make as much as $110,747 per year.

4. Geotechnical Engineer
Geotechnical engineers assess the natural foundations for engineering projects that are supported by rock or soil. They plan and supervise geological data acquisition and analysis, and prepare engineering designs, reports and recommendations.
On average, they make as much as $111,784 per year.

3. Geomatics Engineer
Geomatics engineers gather, model, analyze and manage spatially referenced data (information identified according to location).
On average, they make as much as $164,400 per year.

2. Snubbing Services Operators and Supervisors
Snubbing services operators and supervisors insert and remove drill pipe, tubing and specialized equipment into and from oil and gas wells when blowout preventers are closed to contain well pressure.
Incomes for snubbing services operators and supervisors range from $60,000 a year to $180,000 a year (2009 estimate).

1. Drilling and Service Rig Managers
Oil and gas well drilling and service rig managers supervise large crews of specialized workers on drilling and service rigs.
Drilling rig managers typically are paid a day rate. Depending on location and hours of service, service rig managers may be paid a day rate or an hourly rate. A drilling rig manager who works 200 days a year could realize potential earnings from $175,000 and $250,000 a year (2009 estimate). A service rig manager, who is not required to travel and work away from home in the same way a drilling rig manager is expected to, will earn somewhat less.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Our Top 10 Canadian Heroes, According To A Poll

About 12,000 Canadians participated in the online exercise, which began Dec. 11 and closed last month.

Canadian Heroes 6
 

Canadian Heroes 1

Pierre Elliott Trudeau
Terry Fox

Canadian Heoes 2

Tommy Douglas
Lester B. Pearson

Canadian Heroes 3

Chris Hadfield
David Suzuki

Canadian Heroes 4

Jack Layton
Sir John A. Macdonald

Canadian Heroes 5

Wayne Gretzky
Romeo Dallaire
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

   
   
HAUNTED PLACES 2

Queen’s Park, Toronto
Before it was home to the Ontario legislature, the grounds of Queen’s Park belonged to a psychiatric hospital. Rumour is, three former female inmates roam the current building in their ghostly form. Other spirits have been spotted in the Lieutenant Governor’s suite and a scowling man in a red military uniform is believed to haunt the main staircase.

Tranquille Sanatorium, Near Kamloops, B.C.
In 1907, the expansive Tranquille Sanatorium, a mini, self-sustaining community, opened to treat tuberculosis patients; then became a mental hospital before closing for good in 1983. A series of underground tunnels run under the decaying, crumbling complex. Today, frequent sightings of glowing orb and paranormal activity have earned it a reputation as Canada’s most haunted place. Book a nighttime tour (through tranquillefarmfresh.ca), a fitting prelude to nightmares.

HAUNTED PLACES 3

Room 202, Fort Garry Hotel, Winnipeg
Do you mind having a roommate for the night? Some hotel guests avoid the notorious room 202 and request suites as far away as possible, while others embrace the idea of having an entity for company and ask for it. Housekeeping staff has reported blood oozing down the walls in the room. Former guests say a figure in a cloak stood at the end of the bed watching them. A long-ago suicide and a murder in the grand hotel built in 1913 may be the root of this evil.

Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia
The rocks upon which the lighthouse sits are picturesque, yet potentially deadly. In 1800, a woman named Margaret watched in horror as her new husband slipped and suffered a fatal head injury. She took her own life shortly after. Tourists have said they see a woman wearing a blue dress about to jump into the sea. The lesson here: Be careful on the rocks.

HAUNTED PLACES 4

Montmorency Falls, Quebec
Here’s another downer love story… a woman engaged to a soldier and happily prepares for their nuptials. But her finance’s called to war and killed in the battle of Montmorency Falls in 1759. A year later, she puts on her wedding dress and jumps into the falls. Her body has yet to be recovered. Now, visitors say they’ve seen the Lady in White through the mist. Urban legend, wishful thinking, or too much wine?

Delta Bessborough Hotel, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
This elegant hotel built in 1935 is known for friendly staff, some of which never retire. Word is, a former employee fell to his death, down seven stories onto the marble floor of the main lobby. His spirit, dressed in a gray suit and fedora, lingers on, greeting guests silently with a warm smile.

HAUNTED PLACES 5

Fortress of Louisbourg, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia
Fort Louisbourg has oodles of history. Once a military cornerstone of New France, this historic site now marks its 300th birthday this year. Some say at least four spirits roam this Parks Canada site. The cries of a baby pierce the silence of the evening hours; a sea captain steps in to stop visitors from falling down stairs; a weeping nurse and a violent entity which locks doors in the bakery and moves 300-pound industrial bread holders. Say hi to all of them during a Louisbourg After Dark tour.

The Blue Ghost Tunnel, Thorold, Ontario
Green slime, unexplained noises, and a demonic energy. Welcome to the Merritton, a.k.a The Blue Ghost, Tunnel in Thorold, Ontario, not far from the Welland Canal. Ghost hunters say that the men mangled and killed during the building of the canal haunt this tunnel, closed permanently in 1915 after being used for just 39 years.

HAUNTED PLACES 6

The Keg Mansion, Toronto
Built in 1868, this grand house on Jarvis St. was once the home to Toronto’s most elite families, the McMasters and the Masseys. The Keg bought it in 1976 to turn it into a restaurant. Ghostly encounters have occurred around the central staircase and the second floor women’s washroom. Hearing phantom footsteps and seeing a male ghost child playing on the stairs may be included gratis with your steak dinner.

Hotel Fairmont Vancouver
Her name was Jennie Pearl Cox, but around the hotel, she’s known as the Lady in Red. She was a regular at the hotel in the 1930s and 1940s. After her death, she never checked out. Her ghost has been seen passing through elevator doors, especially on the 14th floor. Staff says she’s a nice apparition. The hotel even named a cocktail after her.

   
More Haunted Destinations In Canada
   

The Haunted Walk in Kingston
You can’t miss them. Dressed in black capes and holding lanterns, guides of the Haunted Walks through the Limestone City as well as Fort Henry look the part as they take guests on a stroll to see the places where tragedy happened. They claim to have converted the biggest of skeptics, so beware!

Fairmont Empress in Victoria
One of the oldest and most famous hotels in Victoria, there’s almost too many spirits reportedly haunting this place to count! A lost woman, ghoulish little girl, a chambermaid and a carpenter who hung himself from the rafters are all said to haunt the landmark hotel.

St. Louis Ghost Train in St. Louis, Saskatchewan
Although the tracks are no longer there, a mysterious light appears in the area after dark. There are a number of paranormal and natural theories as to why it happens, but the legend about a railroad worker who lost his head on the tracks and searches for it by lantern light is the most bone-chilling.

Fort York in Toronto
This red-coated guard is giving a tour to students but there’s also been reports of a guard (who is not among the living) who haunts the fort’s barracks. Some claim a female spirit hangs around the officers’ quarters too. Visitors to the fort can take part in the After Dark Lantern Tour between Oct. 23-27 to get the ghoulish details.

Fort York in Toronto

Plains of Abraham in Quebec City
The site of a battle between the French and British empires in 1759, the area is allegedly haunted by soldiers who perished in the clash. Ghoulish walks are taking place on the site Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. and on Oct. 20 at 6:30 p.m. as well as 9:30 p.m.

Vogue Theatre in Vancouver
Everyone likes to be entertained but if you run into one of this theatre’s two resident ghosts, it will be a night you won’t forget. One spirit reportedly opens doors in the dressing area, while the other one has been spotted in the theatre’s seats. His attire? A tuxedo.

Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel in Alberta
A top pick among travellers for its history and the Canadian Rockies as a picturesque backdrop, this property attracts guests of the living and non-living! From a bellman named Sam who disappears when guests ask for help to a bride who allegedly fell down the hotel’s staircase to her death, this hotel has its fair share of spirits. Is it just us, or can the same be said for many Fairmont properties?

Old Montreal
Popular for its cultural, art galleries, boutiques and restaurants, a visit to Montreal isn’t complete without exploring the older part of the city. But with anything old comes the possibility of ghostly spirits. According to Trip Advisor, there’s been reports of a prostitute looking for her head in the area.

HI-Ottawa Jail
It operated as a jail for a century, so there’s no wonder guests of this hostel report paranormal activity from prisoners who never left. From sounds of crying at night to clothes reportedly being scattered around unexplained, this place isn’t for the faint of heart.

Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto
According to a report by Hotels.com, this historic hotel has a few guests that are, um, permanent. The eighth floor is said to be haunted by children’s voices, and there’s also a man in a purple jacket who haunts the grounds.

Fairmont Royal York

HAUNTED PLACES A1

   
   
   
   
   
   

   
   
BEST: British Columbia
46.1 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it. Only 14.8 per cent of people said they had to wait eight days or more, the least of any province.

2: Saskatchewan
43.1 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it.

3: Prince Edward Island
42.9 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it.

4: Ontario
42.4 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it.

5: Quebec
39.7 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it. However, 40.5 per cent had to wait eight days or more, the largest proportion of any province.

6: Nova Scotia
39.3 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it.

7: Manitoba
38.2 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it, while 38.6 per cent could get an appointment in two to seven days after calling.

8: Alberta
36.3 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it.

9: New Brunswick
34.2 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it.

WORST: Newfoundland & Labrador
30.9 per cent of respondents could get an appointment at their doctor the same or next day when they needed it, whereas 40.4 per cent had to wait two to seven days. As well, 28.7 per cent had to wait eight days or more.

 
Top 10 Hospitals In Canada – CBC Rate My Hospital
   
Sturgeon Community Hospital
City: St. Albert, Alberta

   

   
High River General Hospital
City: High River, Alberta

Banff- Mineral Springs Hospital, Covenant Health
City: Banff, Alberta

Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital
City: Smiths Falls, Ontario

Lamont Health Care Centre
City: Lamont, Alberta

Victoria General Hospital
City: Winnipeg, Manitoba

St. Joseph’s Health Care London
City: London, Ontario

Chaleur Regional Hospital
City: Bathurst, New Brunswick

Saskatoon City Hospital
City: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Grace Hospital
City: Winnipeg, Manitoba

   
   
   
   
   
   

   
   

10) Hamilton
Canada’s top cities for public transit.

Score: 42

9) Calgary
Score: 43

8) Edmonton
Score: 44

7) Quebec City
Score: 46

6) Brampton
Score: 48

5) Ottawa
Score: 49

4) Winnipeg
Score: 51

3) Vancouver
Score: 74

2) Montreal
Score: 77

1) Toronto
Score: 78

   
   
   
   
   
   

   
   
10. Island Highway, Malahat
About 2 kilometres south of Shawnigan Lake Road

9. Westside Road, Vernon
About 35 kilometres west of Vernon, near Chief Saddleman Road

8. Maple Crescent, Maple Ridge
At Lorne Avenue

7. Patullo Bridge, Surrey

6. McKenzie Avenue, Victoria
At Highway 1

5. George Massey Tunnel, Richmond

4. Westside Road, West Kelowna
About 17 kilometres north of West Kelowna

3. Cosens Bay Road, Coldstream
About 14 kilometres south of Vernon

2. Westside Road, West Kelowna
About 40 kilometres north of West Kelowna, near Attenborough Road

1. Silver Star Road, Vernon
West of Greenway Road, about 16 kilometres west of Vernon

   
Worst Roads In British Columbia 2013

The list of roads deemed the worst in British Columbia, according to respondents in a BCAA survey.

10) Todd Road, Kamloops
  9) Harris Road, Saturna Island
  8) Sea to Sky Highway, Pemberton
  7) Indian River Drive, North Vancouver
  6) Island Highway, Malahat
  5) Vernon-Slocan Highway, Cherryville
  4) Pacific Rim Highway, Port Alberni
  3) George Massey Tunnel, Delta
  2) BC Parkway, Vancouver/Burnaby/New Westminster
  1) Westside Road, Kelowna

   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

#1   Weren’t We Promised Property Rights?
Conservatives failed to enshrine property rights in the Constitution as well as a legislative guarantee that timely compensation would be paid to all persons deprived of their personal property as a result of federal government action — a promise made in the Conservatives’ 2006 electoral platform.

#2

Conservatives have not enacted anti-spam legislation, despite passing the bill three years ago.

It is still hasn’t been brought into force.

#3

The Conservative government has yet to implement the 2011 Digital Economy Strategy.

#4   No Reception
The Conservative government failed to find another big investor in the wireless market. Cellular coverage outside large cities is still spotty and nonexistent in some places.

#5

The Tories increased import tariffs on 1,200 goods include items such as shampoo, deodorant, pens, pre-cut vegetables, canned tuna and even saris and ground spices.

NDP Leader Blasts Conservatives For Proposed Sari And Spice Tax

The Liberals and the NDP are calling a tariff increase on everything from pens, deodorants and shampoo to bicycles and pre-cut vegetables – imported from 72 countries that include China and India – a tax.

“It’s a question of hypocrisy on the part of the government, where they made a big show of saying there were no new taxes and then they are raising the taxes on a huge number of consumer goods that are going to hit Canadians right in the pocketbook,” NDP finance critic Peggy Nash

#6

Conservative MPs voted against an air passenger bill of rights — twice. In 2009, they voted unanimously against it and then helped defeat it in committee. In 2013, they voted against it again.

#7

Conservative MPs voted against a 2009 motion to create legislation to protect credit card customers. Instead, they chose to introduce a voluntary code of conduct.

#8

The Conservative government failed to enact many recommendation of its own Financial Literacy Taskforce.

#9

The Conservatives raised the age of eligibility for Old Age Security from 65 to 67 years of age.

#10

Conservatives in the Senate defeated a bill, S-216, aimed at protecting Nortel retirees and employees on long term disability — and others who would find themselves in similar situations — who saw their pensions and benefits vanish after the company they worked for went into bankruptcy protection.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Baked Goods 1
Baked Goods 2
Baked Goods 3
Baked Goods 4
Baked Goods 5
Baked Goods 6

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

These vintage posters bring us back to a simpler time in Alberta — when vacations were long, luxurious and had far fewer tourists.

Vintage Ads 3
Vintage Ads 1
Vintage Ads 2