Archives for category: Business

 
Pic #1
Got Milk? Yes
Chocolate milk in your Iced Capp

Not only does it give your regular drink a kick, but for those of you who aren’t fans of that coffee taste, the chocolate milk does a good job of disguising it.

Pic #2
Make Your Bagels More Exciting
Additional veggies and salt and pepper on your bagels
Pic #3
No, this won’t cost you extra, but it will make your cream cheese and bagel taste better. Some readers shared their favourite combos including: a bagel with cream cheese, tomato slices, salt and pepper (for hangovers), a bagel with herb and garlic cream cheese topped with cucumbers and tomatoes, and a bagel with cheddar cheese, tomato, salt and pepper, cucumber and lettuce. Note, extras will cost extras.

A “Cheap Mocha”
Half hot chocolate/half coffee
Pic #4
This is basically like a cheap mocha. The next time you decide to get your regular Double Double, ask for half hot chocolate. One reader mentioned asking for whipped cream as well.

When Your Croissant Is Fattier
Croissant with cheese and butter HEATED
Pic #5
Yes, you probably already feel a little guilty indulging in a cheese or butter croissant, but to make things even better (and fattier), ask your server to heat your croissant with a slice of Swiss cheese or with just straight up butter. Drool.

The Chocolate Explosion
Chocolate whipped cream on your hot chocolate
Pic #6
If the regular hot chocolate isn’t chocolatey enough for your liking, add chocolate whipped cream.

Hot Water
Plain hot water
Pic #7
If, for whatever reason you just want a cup of hot water (maybe for your instant noodles?), just ask. Sometimes, it will be free, but most of the time you will have to pay a fee.

Mint, Please
Mint with your Iced Capps
Pic #8
Missing out on some freshness? The next time you order an Iced Capp, ask for a shot of mint flavour as well.

Warm Doughnuts
Pic #9

Yup, simple as that. If you want to take your doughnut to the next level, ask your server to warm it up for you in the toaster or the microwave. People of the web advise a warm sour glazed doughnut as the winner.

Ultimate Breakfast Sandwich
A hashbrown IN your sandwich
Pic #10
If you want to add additional calories to your breakfast sandwich, ask for a hash brown to be put right in the middle. However, we don’t advise this off-the-menu hack during rush hour. Just order them separately and do it yourself.

Spicy Bagel
Barbecue sauce on your bagel
Pic #11
For chains that carry barbecue sauce and those of you with BBQ-loving taste buds, ask your server for barbecue sauce on your bagel with cream cheese. We hear it’s delicious.

Timbits … For Your Pet
A free Timbit
Pic #12
We had one reader and former employee tell us people would ask for Timbits for their pets. We’re only wondering if the “‘pets” were actually pets. However, one employee told us Timbits on their own are 25 cents and this free Timbit scenario doesn’t always work.

Skip The Cream Cheese Altogether
Ask: Peanut butter
Pic #13
While Tim Hortons may be known for their flavoured cream cheeses, one reader told us you can also ask for peanut butter on your bagels — a raisin bagel with peanut butter tastes the best.

Tea Tea Tea
Mixing two teas together
Pic #14
For a new take on teas, try a peppermint and green tea combination or a green tea and honey lemon combo if you have a cold. Mixing tea bags will cost you an additional 10 cents.

Grilled Cheese With Extras
Veggies
Pic #15
Your grilled cheese may already come with tomatoes and bacon, but you can also ask for additional veggies like lettuce and cucumbers to make a grilled sandwich.

Half And Half
Half chili and half lasagna
Pic #16
Half and halfs aren’t just for drinks anymore. If your Tim Hortons location still sells chili and lasagna (or brings it back this fall/winter) ask for a half and half.

The Veggie Sandwich Is Still There, Folks
Pic #17

You may not see the veggie sandwich (cucumber, lettuce and tomato on a bun) on the menu anymore, but you can still order it either on a bun or bagel.

Extra Patties
Play around with your breakfast sandwich
Pic #18
Besides adding a hash brown to your breakfast sandwich, some readers even get away with asking for extra patties or more egg — for an additional cost, of course.

Specialty Lattes
Tea in your latte
Pic #19
You can also ask for the addition of a tea bag or flavour shot in your latte or hot beverage. Chai tea latte anyone?

Whipped Cream All Day
Whipped cream on anything
Pic #20
On your latte, hot chocolate, Iced Capp, whatever you’re in the mood for, ask your server for whipped cream on top.

Get A Panino Instead
Ask for your sandwich to be a panino
Pic #21
If you have a favourite Tim Hortons sandwich (BLT, ham and Swiss, veggie etc.), ask the server to make it as a panino. You may get charged extra, but your sandwich will taste 10 times better “grilled.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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A prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese)

 
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Employees stand in front of a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
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A man orders food and a coffee from a touch screen while seated at his table in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #2

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A prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #3

#4
Touch screens show the progress of your order in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #4

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Alana Ziemski works behind the bar in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #5

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Alana Ziemski pours cold brew coffee behind the bar where beer taps are also available in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #6

#7
Michelle Siman works behind a display of doughnuts in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
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Michelle Siman wears a new uniform while typing an order in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
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#9
Marc Caira, right, president and CEO of Tim Hortons and David Clanachan, COO of Tim Hortons, order coffee in a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #9

#10
Employees stand in front of a prototype of a Tim Hortons “Restaurant of the Future” at the company’s owners conference in Toronto on Wednesday, July 16, 2014.
Pic #10

 
Related topic:

Tim Hortons, Burger King confirm talks for potential ‘strategic transaction’

“Tim Hortons and Burger King each have strong franchisee networks and iconic brands that are loved by their respective consumers,” the companies said in a statement.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

The home of the oil sands is the richest municipality in Canada, according to new data from Statistics Canada.

Source: StatsCan
Number represents median family income for 2010.

 

10. Kingston, Ont. – $77,140
  9. Victoria, B.C. – $77,820
  8. St. John’s, Newfoundland – $78,210
  7. Saskatoon, Sask. – $80,570
  6. Oshawa, Ont. – $82,270
  5. Guelph, Ont. – $82,560
  4. Regina, Sask. – $84,890
  3. Edmonton, Alta. – $87,930
  2. Calgary, Alta. – $89,490
  1. Ottawa, Ont. – $90,790

 

Canada’s Richest Small Towns

All 10 of the wealthiest small towns are in western Canada, a reflection of the growing imbalance between regional economies across the country.

10. Whitehorse, Yukon – $92,690
  9. Cold Lake, Alta. – $94,980
  8. Thompson, Man. – $95,580
  7. Grande Prairie, Alta. – $95,620
  6. Lloydminster, Sask. – $96,280
  5. Fort St, John, B.C. – $96,510
  4. Okotoks, Alta. – $101,670
  3. Estevan, Sask. – $106,680
  2. Yellowknife, N.W.T. – $128,810
  1. Fort McMurray (Wood Buffalo), Alta. – $169,970

Among larger cities, the biggest gains in family income were found in Guelph, Ontario (up 2.1 per cent from the previous year), while Vancouver saw the biggest drop — down 2.5 per cent.

Among smaller towns and cities, Sept-Iles, Quebec saw the biggest jump (up 5.8 per cent) and Kitimat, B.C., saw the biggest decline (down 7.3 per cent).

Statistics Canada.

 

 

Canada’s Richest Neighbourhoods

Source: Canadian Business

 
Sunnyside and Edgehill, Westmount, Montreal
Average Household Net Worth: $9.37 million
Average Annual Household Income: $503,935
Average House Price: $2.49 million

Lexington Avenue, Westmount, Montreal
Average Household Net Worth: $9.96 million
Average Annual Household Income: $590,695
Average House Price: $1.8 million

Lawrence Park North, Toronto
Average Household Net Worth: $10.44 million
Average Annual Household Income: $906,266
Average House Price: $2.81 million

Kerrisdale, Vancouver
Average Household Net Worth: $10.59 million
Average Annual Household Income: $1,277,431
Average House Price: $2.79 million

Forest Hill South/UCC, Toronto
Average Household Net Worth: $10.63 million
Average Annual Household Income: $629,972
Average House Price: $3.18 million

Summit Park, Westmount
Average Household Net Worth: $11 million
Average Annual Household Income: $906,659
Average House Price: $2.4 million

Shaugnessy Heights, Vancouver
Average Household Net Worth: $12 million
Average Annual Household Income: $777,184
Average House Price: $3.09 million

Sunnybrook, Toronto
Average Household Net Worth: $20.82 million
Average Annual Household Income: $311,979
Average House Price: $2.29 million

York Mills/Windfields, Toronto
Average Household Net Worth: $21.55 million
Average Annual Household Income: $1,212,275
Average House Price: $3.4 million

The Bridle Path, Toronto
Average Household Net Worth: $22.27 million
Average Annual Household Income: $936,137
Average House Price: $2.24 million

RICH CITIES 1

RICH CITIES 2

RICH CITIES 3

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

The Name Explained
What’s behind Lululemon’s name? Company founder Chip Wilson has offered an odd explanation.

“The reason the Japanese liked (my former skateboard brand, ‘Homeless’) was because it had an L in it and a Japanese marketing firm wouldn’t come up with a brand name with an L in it,” he explained to National Post Business Magazine. “L is not in their vocabulary. It’s a tough pronunciation for them. So I thought, next time I have a company, I’ll make a name with three Ls and see if I can get three times the money. It’s kind of exotic for them. I was playing with Ls and I came up with Lululemon. It’s funny to watch them try to say it,” he said.

LULULEMON 1

However, The Globe and Mail notes the company’s site says the name was the result of a survey.

Child Labour Comments
Back in 2005, Wilson’s comments about child labour “went over like a lead balloon” at a Vancouver conference, according to The Tyee.

The site reported:

“Wilson told the delegates third-world children should be allowed to work in factories because it provides them with much-needed wages. They also say he argued that even in Canada there is a place for 12- and 13-year-old street youths to find work in local factories as an alternative to collecting handouts.”

Ayn Rand Totes
Lululemon’s ‘Who Is John Galt?’ tote bags were a nod to Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged, which promotes individualism and capitalism over collectivism. But some customers didn’t appreciate the political message.

LULULEMON 2

“Who is John Galt?” is the opening line of Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged, described in The Globe as a novel “which rails against government and advocates self-interest as a key ingredient of a better world.” Some Lulu shoppers felt Rand’s philosophy was at odds with their community-minded beliefs. Others, um, shrugged.

The company defended the product on its blog:

“Chip Wilson, first read this book when he was eighteen years old working away from home. Only later, looking back, did he realize the impact the book’s ideology had on his quest to elevate the world from mediocrity to greatness (it is not coincidental that this is Lululemon’s company vision).”

Seaweed Slip
In 2007, Lululemon came under scrutiny for its VitaSea clothing, which the company said was made with seaweed that provided health benefits.

A New York Times article challenged the company’s claim and said it found the material showed “no significant difference in mineral levels between the VitaSea fabric and cotton T-shirts.”

Independent testing “confirmed the presence of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids in the VitaSea fabric,” a company statement said, but the retailer agreed to remove references to therapeutic benefits of the product.

Sheer Insanity
Lululemon’s too-sheer yoga pants were perhaps the company’s most infamous headache.

The company pulled its defective Luon pants from shelves in March 2013, following customer complaints that the pants were see-through.

Lululemon said it expected to lose as much as $67 million from the blunder. To make matters worse for the retailer, it was hit with three class-action lawsuits related to the recall.

Bend Over?!
Adding insult to injury? Some customers seeking refunds said Lululemon salespeople asked them to demonstrate the sheerness of their pants by bending over.

“I went into my local store to return my Astro pants and Invert crops, both purchased this month. I was asked to BEND OVER in order to determine sheerness. The sales associate then perused my butt in the dim lighting of the change room and deemed them “not sheer.” I felt degraded that this is how the recall is being handled,” according to one customer.

The company responded, saying it would offer returns “no questions asked.”

Pilling Pants
Even more quality complaints plagued the company following the sheer pants recall.

Shoppers weren’t impressed with yoga pants pilling and seams coming apart. And yes, some still complained that the pants were still too sheer.

Lululemon Ignites Outrage With A Sign That Seemed To Mock A Charity For Battered Women

Chip Wilson On Women’s Bodies
Wilson put his foot in his mouth when he told Bloomberg TV that “some women’s bodies just actually don’t work” with their products, which have been known to pill or look too sheer.

“It’s really about the rubbing through the thighs, how much pressure is there over a period of time and how much they use it,” he said.

Again With The Thighs
Not long after Wilson’s comment about thighs rubbing together sparked outrage, a Bethesda, Md. shop raised eyebrows when it featured a sign in its window that read: “Cups of chai, apple pies, rubbing thighs?”

The brand apologized for the controversial display, saying “We celebrate that thighs rub together — ours do too.”

LULULEMON 3

Lululemon Chairmen, Chip Wilson’s Apology Called Worst Ever
 

 

Lululemon Founder Insults Women
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Source: Brand Finance Canada

20: Shoppers Drug Mart
Brand value: $1.97 billion

19: Canadian Tire
Brand value: $2.04 billion

18: BlackBerry
Brand value: $2.04 billion

17: Loblaws
Brand value: $2.06 billion

16: McCain Foods
Brand value: $2.12 billion

15: Brookfield Properties
Brand value: $2.33 billion

14: CN Rail
Brand value: $2.89 billion

13: Shaw
Brand value: $3.06 billion

12: Manulife
Brand value: $3.3 billion

11: Telus
Brand value: $3.65 billion

10: George Weston
Brand value: $3.88 billion

9: Bombardier
Brand value: $3.96 billion

8: Enbridge
Brand value: $4.17 billion

7: Rogers
Brand value: $4.55 billion

6: CIBC
Brand value: $4.8 billion

5. Bell
Brand value: $5.54 billion

4. Bank of Montreal (BMO)
Brand value: $6.49 billion

3. Scotiabank
Brand value: $7.03 billion

2: Royal Bank of Canada (RBC)
Brand value: $10.28 billion

1. TD Bank
Brand value: $10.4 billion

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Are you concerned about the closure of Canadian retailers?
 
 
Jumbo Video
The free popcorn made arguing over which VHS movie to rent bearable.
The company was founded in May 1987 and at one point claimed to be the third-largest player in the Canadian video rental industry. In 2004, due to financial issues that had been prevalent for many years, the assets of the chain were purchased by Quebecor Media. This resulted in the re-branding of the stores with the current logo.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumbo_Video

Brands 1

Kettle Creek Canvas Co.
For all your canvas clothing and accessories needs. The wallets and pencil cases were must-haves for 1980s Southern Ontario kids.

Brands 2

The It Store
This novelty-items store was where you could buy any Troll doll or Beanie Baby, or marvel at the dirty gift selections while pretending to shop for a Troll or Beanie Baby.

Brands 3

Eaton’s
One of Canada’s most storied and oldest retailers went bankrupt in 1999. The department stores founded by Timothy Eaton in 1869 became famous for their catalogues, sponsorship of the Toronto Santa Claus parade and the downtown Toronto shopping centre that still bears its name.

1

Dominion
This chain of grocery stores was rebranded as A&P before it was bought out by Metro. We miss the chain founded in 1919, party because of those plastic grocery bins you could load onto a conveyor belt to get them outside, but mostly because of their awesome font.

Brands 7

Bata Shoes
Although Toronto is home to the Bata shoe museum, the chain has shuttered all of its Bata and Athlete’s World stores in the country where it was once based. It does, however, continue to sell footwear on almost every other continent.

Once a staple of malls across Canada, the last of the Bata Ltd. shoe stores will disappear over the next few months as the company closes its remaining 30 outlets in the country.

Brands 8

Sam the Record Man
It was once Canada’s largest music retailer boasting “140 locations, coast to coast.” The chain was founded by Sam Sniderman in 1937. Along with A&A Records and Canada’s last national music store chain, Music World, it fell victim to the Internet age by the end of the 2000s.

1

A&A Records
A&A had noticeable flagship stores in downtown Toronto and downtown Montreal. It launched in the early 1960s and went bankrupt in 1991.

1

Beaver Lumber
Even if you weren’t a fan of lumber shopping, how could you complain about being dragged through a store whose logo is an overall-clad, skipping beaver? Also, it was owned by Molson — yes, the beer people. What’s more Canadian than that?

Brands 5

Becker’s
This was THE convenience store chain — known for its plastic jugs of milk — for many small-town Ontarians before being sold to the parent company of rival Mac’s Convenience Stores in 1996. It was so Canadian, its chocolate milk got a shout-out in the special thanks section on many Rush albums.

Brands 6

Big V Drug Stores
Believe it or not, Ontario once had another pharmacy chain that gave Shoppers Drug Mart a real run for its money.

Brands 4

Northern Getaway
Ever since this retailer of cliched Canadian clothing shuttered, we have no idea where to get puffy paint sweatshirts with pictures of loons on them, or the ugly Christmas sweater for all of those trendy theme parties.

Brands 9

Randy River
The home to discount menswear and flamed shirts galore was once an institution in malls across the country, but has been reduced to just a handful of shops in small-town malls.

Brands 10

SAAN
Once a staple in every small town in Alberta and B.C., it had great, cheap jeans.

Brands 11

Tabi
The classic Canadian “mom store” closed in 2011, after 30 years in operation.

Brands 12

Towers
A Zellers-esque chain perhaps best known to eastern Canadians, who might be familiar with the chain’s animated squirrel named Sparky.

Brands 13

Zellers
Zeddy!

Brands 14

 
Zellers- Everything Must Go
 

 
Zeddy in the Woods