Archives for category: Jobs

 

According to the Bank of Canada’s Summer 2014 Business Outlook Survey, 22 per cent of businesses claim their company is facing a shortage in workers. But other reports have called Canada’s labour shortage a myth.

Business Outlook Survey

Labour, skills shortage in Canada? Budget watchdog says no
Parliamentary Budget Office’s Mostafa Askari says warnings from Prime Minister Stephen Harper not supported by PBO’s statistics

Either way, some businesses have taken to tackling this issue by encouraging workers to work past retirement and have asked others to work more overtime rather than find replacements, according to the Fraser Institute’s report:

Fraser Institute: Do Labour Shortages Exist in Canada?
Reconciling the Views of Employers and Economists

Related topic:
Biggest Salary Increases In 2015:
Alberta (3.1%) and Saskatchewan (2.9%) will lead the country with projected overall base salary increases higher than the national average

 
Provinces where employees work the most hours:

10. Quebec

Average actual hours worked per week: 31.9

Quebecers worked an average of 0.2 hours less than the year before, topping off their fifth year of being at the bottom of this hardest-working list. Unfortunately, over the past three decades, the province has seen its economic performance decline as a result of lagging labour productivity, according to the HEC Montréal Centre for Productivity and Prosperity

9. British Columbia

Average actual hours worked per week: 32.6

British Columbia workers were on the job 0.1 hours less than the year before, topping off their fifth consecutive year of working less than the Canadian average. Finding a job in the province has also become more difficult — July’s unemployment rate dropped to 5.9 per cent from 6.2 per cent in June, according to Statistics Canada.

British Columbia’s government has remained focused on improving the province’s productivity, which has consistently lagged the national average by about 10 per cent, according to the Business Council of British Columbia. The province has promising assets, including needed resources such as lumber and shale gas, but its major economic driver, lumber, was hampered by the slow housing market in the U.S. The government has focused its efforts on B.C.’s natural gas industry with hopes of shipping it to Asian markets.

8. Nova Scotia

Average actual hours worked per week: 32.8

For the first time in five years, Nova Scotian workers were on the job less than an average of 33 hours. The previous year, employees worked 33.3 hours — the least amount of hours among Maritime provinces. Work has become harder to find in Nova Scotia — the province’s unemployment rate climbed to 9.4 per cent in July from 8.7 per cent the month before.

Nova Scotia’s economy has performed the worst across the country for the last 20 years, according to TheGlobe and Mail. A recent report by Acadia University also found that the province’s population will continue to decline over the next 20 years with young people moving away to pursue work elsewhere. But the tide could be turning. The province’s economy is expected to grow by 2.3 per cent this year thanks to natural gas production in its Deep Panuke offshore field and upgrades to the Halifax shipyard in preparation for the navy ship building contract that begins in 2015, according to the Conference Board of Canada.

6. Ontario (tied)

Ontario’s workers worked fewer hours in 2013 compared to the year before (when they worked 33.7 hours). Over the past five years, Ontario’s employees have worked slightly more hours than the national average and fewer workers are being paid to put in overtime hours. Ontario’s unemployment rate held steady in July at 7.5 per cent.

Ontario’s economy, which has lost manufacturing jobs over the years, is dragging down Canada’s economic potential, according to Finance Minister Joe Oliver. However, Premier Kathleen Wynne has pledged to eliminate the province’s $12.5 billion deficit within three years. In the province’s latest predictions, Ontario’s economy will continue to see slow growth due to the aging population.

6. Manitoba (tied)

Average actual hours worked per week: 33.5

Manitoba’s workers tie Ontario for the number of hours worked. There was a 0.4 hours drop from the number of hours worked in the previous year, but Manitobans are on the job slightly longer than the national average of 33.4. In July, Manitoba boasted an unemployment rate of just 5.3 per cent.

Manitoba boasts a diverse economy, which served it well during the recession, and it’s looking to diversify further by developing a potash mine in the western part of the province, according to CBC News. Currently, the manufacturing sector accounts for the largest industry in the province (contributing 12 per cent of the province’s GDP) with plants for home construction, such as doors, windows and furniture found across the province.

Manitoba Business Facts

5. New Brunswick

Average actual hours worked per week: 34.1

In 2013, New Brunswick workers put in 0.5 less hours than the year. Unemployment is high in New Brunswick with the rate reaching 10 per cent in July, up from 9.6 per cent in June.

The province’s economy has been struggling for years and its labour productivity needs be improved, according to the Conference Board of Canada. But there is hope: New Brunswick’s shale gas reserves offer the potential to turn the province’s fortunes around, says federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver.

4. Prince Edward Island

Average actual hours worked per week: 33.9

Long hours are normal for workers in P.E.I., but the situation has improved slightly — average hours worked was 34.1 in 2012. While unemployment remains high at 9.4 per cent, the province saw a slight 0.4 percentage point drop in July from June.

P.E.I. relies heavily on natural resource industries, such as agriculture and fishing. This year, growth is expected to be slow at 1.4 per cent due to a contraction in the construction industry, according to the Conference Board of Canada. Also, the potato industry recently took a hit with the closing of the McCain French Fry plant, which led to the loss of 121 jobs. But within the last decade, many investors from China moved to P.E.I. to start their own businesses.

3. Newfoundland and Labrador

Average actual hours worked per week: 34.7

Newfoundlanders have consistently worked longer hours over the last five years. In 2012, hours worked reached an average of 35.3 before dipping in 2012. While the Maritime province is one of the hardest working provinces in the nation, July unemployment remained high at a rate of 12.4 per cent. However, wages have steadily risen to counter a change in labour demand, according to a recent report by the Fraser Institute.

For years, Newfoundland was known as one of Canada’s poorest provinces, but its economy has reversed fortunes thanks to oil production. Revenues from the industry have contributed to the fastest GDP growth rate in Canada (7.9 per cent), outpacing even China’s economic growth. Along with a booming economy, Newfoundland has faced a labour shortage, leading to a reliance on temporary foreign workers.

2. Saskatchewan

Average actual hours worked per week: 35.5

In 2013, Saskatchewan workers put in long hours, though their work time did not increase from the year before. In July, the province claimed the lowest unemployment rate in the country at 3.2 per cent, a slight decline from 3.9 per cent in June. There’s been a dramatic 60 per cent increase over the last decade in the number of workers who’ve worked paid overtime, outpacing the average Canadian paid overtime increase of 3.3 per cent.

Saskatchewan harnesses the its natural resources to drive its economy with goods such as grains, potash and uranium. Since 2010, the economy has outpaced all other provinces, but that’s expected to change, predicts the Conference Board of Canada. Uranium mining, construction and manufacturing are all expected to pick up and it’s also expected that the province will add more jobs.

1. Alberta

Average actual hours worked per week: 35.8

Workers in Alberta’s major cities earn the highest incomes in the country and they also work the hardest too. There was a slight 0.2 hour drop in the average hours worked in 2013 compared to 2012, but the hours employees worked rose from 34.3 in 2009. Paid overtime rose by 57 per cent in the last decade with many workers older than 55 working 50 hour work weeks or more. Alberta boasted a low unemployment rate of 4.7 per cent in July.

According to a report by the Conference Board of Canada, Alberta has the strongest economy in Canada thanks to the oil industry. The provincial government is expecting the upcoming 2014-2015 budget to see a surplus position of $1.1 billion. It’s also predicted that within the next three years, Alberta will have the second-largest provincial economy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Alberta released its short-term employment forecast, highlighting in-demand jobs as well as the occupations which could face a labour shortage over the next 10 years.
 

Occupation title: Senior Managers – Financial, Communications Carriers and Other Business Services

Number employed in 2013: 4,600

Occupation title: Sales, Marketing and Advertising Managers

Number employed in 2013: 11,400

Occupation title: Accommodation Service Managers

Number employed in 2013: 6,500

Occupation title: Other Services Managers

Number employed in 2013: 2,000

Occupation title: Supervisors, General Office and Administrative Support Clerks

Number employed in 2013: 5,300

Occupation title: Administrative Officers

Number employed in 2013: 35,400

Occupation title: Civil Engineers

Number employed in 2013: 12,400

Occupation title: Mechanical Engineers

Number employed in 2013: 7,200

Occupation title: Electrical and Electronics Engineers

Number employed in 2013: 6,600

Occupation title: Civil Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Number employed in 2013: 5,900

Occupation title: Mechanical Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Number employed in 2013: 2,700

Occupation title: Construction Estimators

Number employed in 2013: 2,900

Occupation title: Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technologists and Technicians

Number employed in 2013: 4,000

Occupation title: Industrial Instrument Technicians and Mechanics

Number employed in 2013: 4,500

Occupation title: Non-Destructive Testers and Inspectors

Number employed in 2013: 4,400

Occupation title: Computer Network Technicians

Number employed in 2013: 6,200

Occupation title: Specialist Physicians

Number employed in 2013: 4,100

Occupation title: Other Technical Occupations in Therapy and Assessment

Number employed in 2013: 4,500

Occupation title: Technical Sales Specialists, Wholesale Trade

Number employed in 2013: 18,300

Occupation title: Chefs

Number employed in 2013: 4,800

Occupation title: Hairstylists and Barbers

Number employed in 2013: 11,700

Occupation title: Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades

Number employed in 2013: 3,700

Occupation title: Machinists and Machining and Tooling Inspectors

Number employed in 2013: 4,600

Occupation title: Telecommunications Installation and Repair Workers

Number employed in 2013: 2,300

Occupation title: Steamfitters, Pipefitters and Sprinkler System Installers

Number employed in 2013: 11,000

Occupation title: Welders and Related Machine Operators

Number employed in 2013: 25,900

Occupation title: Construction Millwrights and Industrial Mechanics (except Textile)

Number employed in 2013: 10,800

Occupation title: Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics

Number employed in 2013: 14,200

Occupation title: Automotive Service Technicians, Truck and Bus Mechanics and Mechanical Repairers

Number employed in 2013: 16,600

Occupation title: Crane Operators

Number employed in 2013: 3,200

Occupation title: Residential and Commercial Installers and Servicers

Number employed in 2013: 9,400

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Percentage change in average weekly earnings, April 2013 to April 2014.

Source: StatsCan

Education – down 3%

Professional/scientific services – up 0.9%

Health care – up 1.6%

Manufacturing – up 2.7%

Accommodation and food services – up 2.7%

Public administration – up 3.3%

Construction – up 4.1%

Real estate – up 6.9%

Management – up 7.1%

Information & cultural industries – up 7.2%

Transportation and warehousing – up 8.1%

Finance and insurance – up 9.6%

Utilities – up 10%

Mining, oil and gas – up 13.3%

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Highest-Paying Jobs That Don’t Necessarily Need A Degree In Canada

14: Pilot
Average salary $44,224.00

13: Farmer
Average salary: $46,213.00

12: Secretary
Yes, apparently they still have secretaries.

Average salary: $46,369.00

11: Truck Driver
Average salary: $47,562.00

10: Financial advisor
Average salary: $52,635.00

*Having some sort of certification in finance or business would likely help in this career, but isn’t necessary.

9: Bricklayer
Average salary: $53,017.00

8: Recruiter
Average salary: $54,048.00

*Though a degree isn’t required, you may be at a disadvantage when searching for work as a recruiter against those with degrees in human resources.

7: Mechanic
Average salary: $54,279.00

6: Train driver
Average salary: $56,640.00

5: Human resources manager
Average salary: $58,033.00

*As with recruiters, you my be at a disadvantage in this field against those with a human resources degree.

4: Electrician
Average salary: $62,526.00

3: Electrical engineer
Average salary: $81,349.00

*Adzuna explains: For some electrical engineering jobs, a degree is required, and for others it isn’t — there are alternative professional qualifications.

2: Real estate agent
Average salary: $88,200.00

1: Mining and construction
Average salary: $93,320.00

WHERE ARE THE GRAD JOBS?

Number of jobs available at time of Adzuna survey

Energy / oil and gas – 1,906 jobs
Information technology – 2,559
Consultancy – 3,434
Sales – 3,638
Engineering (best)- 4,968

 

BEST-PAYING DEGREE SUBJECTS

Mechanical engineering – $68,075
Engineering (overall) – $67,036
Electrical engineering – $67,712
Software engineering – $67,274
Civil engineering (best) – $68,356

 

WORST-PAYING GRAD JOBS BY SECTOR

Source: Adzuna

PR, advertising and marketing – $42,209
Social work – $42,204
Human resources and recruitment – $42,195
Sales – $41,463
Creative & design (worst) – $36,805

REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF GRADUATE JOBS

Manitoba – 28 grads per job
Average starting salary: $45,650.

British Columbia – 20 grads per job
Average starting salary: $45,450.

Saskatchewan – 15.8 grads per job
Average starting salary: $59,059.

Newfoundland – 13.9 grads per job
Average starting salary: $52,620.

Prince Edward Island – 10.6 grads per job
Average starting salary: $36,776.

Alberta – 9.4 grads per job
Average starting salary: $59,957

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Median Income For Women In Canada
The following data comes from Statistics Canada’s 2011 National Household Survey.

St. Catharines — $23,316
Median income for men: $35,028

Average income for women: $29,775
Average income for men: $43,195

Charlottetown — $24,248
Median income for men: $30,961

Average income for women: $31,542
Average income for men: $40,965

Toronto — $24,359
Median income for men: $31,233

Average income for women: $37,015
Average income for men: $52,716

Montreal — $24,361
Median income for men: $32,887

Average income for women: $32,090
Average income for men: $44,800

Vancouver — $24,551
Median income for men: $31,704

Average income for women: $35,618
Average income for men: $50,897

Hamilton — $24,761
Median income for men: $35,666

Average income for women: $32,561
Average income for men: $45,725

Fredericton — $24,990
Median income for men: $34,527

Average income for women: $32,306
Average income for men: $44,772

St. John’s — $25,593
Median income for men: $35,042

Average income for women: $33,940
Average income for men: $48,258

Thunder Bay — $25,741
Median income for men: $37,821

Average income for women: $32,830
Average income for men: $45,148

Winnipeg — $25,923
Median income for men: $35,776

Average income for women: $32,400
Average income for men: $44,342

Halifax — $26,736
Median income for men: $39,154

Average income for women: $33,398
Average income for men: $48,096

Quebec City — $27,053
Median income for men: $36,117

Average income for women: $32,334
Average income for men: $43,858

Victoria — $27,324
Median income for men: $34,235

Average income for women: $33,792
Average income for men: $42,084

Saskatoon — $28,069
Median income for men: $40,913

Average income for women: $35,426
Average income for men: $52,018

Edmonton — $28,460
Median income for men: $43,929

Average income for women: $37,100
Average income for men: $56,034

Calgary — $30,516
Median income for men: $45,781

Average income for women: $41,438
Average income for men: $68,928

Regina — $31,349
Median income for men: $42,006

Average income for women: $38,488
Average income for men: $53,324

Ottawa — $33,728
Median income for men: $46,513

Average income for women: $41,857
Average income for men: $58,318

Whitehorse — $40,702
Median income for men: $46,265

Average income for women: $45,636
Average income for men: $53,264

Yellowknife — $51,951
Median income for men: $66,153

Average income for women: $56,064
Average income for men: $73,225

Iqaluit — $57,897
Median income for men: $62,187

Average income for women: $63,456
Average income for men: $69,539

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Hamilton — 13.2%
Greater Sudbury — 13.4%
Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo — 13.8%
Ottawa-Gatineau (Ontario) — 14.6%
Guelph — 14.8%
Thunder Bay (in 2009) — 15.3%
Barrie — 16.6%
St. Catharines-Niagara — 17.8
Toronto — 18.1%
Peterborough — 18.4%
Kingston — 18.9%
London — 20.3%
Brantford — 20.5%
Oshawa — 21.8%
Windsor — 24.7%

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Want to see the earning potential of certain occupations in Alberta?
Read the list for average hourly pay and salaries for 30 common jobs.

Hotel Managers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   42.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $24.24
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $52,207.0

Aerospace Engineer
Average Hours Worked (per week):   37.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $54.82
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $106,900.00

Ambulance Attendants
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $30.35
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $65,436.00

Architects
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $38.79
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,693.00

Bartenders
Average Hours Worked (per week):   28.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $11.37
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $17,164.00

Bricklayers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $40.37
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $84,525.00

Civil Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $46.11
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $92,054.00

Social Workers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   32.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $40.24
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $67,175.00

Police Officers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $72.06
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $147,745.00

Computer Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $44.86
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $88,975.00

Mechanic Trades
Average Hours Worked (per week):   41.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $36.08
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,076.00

Corrections Officers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $31.40
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $63,285.00

Crane Operators
Average Hours Worked (per week):   42.9
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $35.90
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $80,626.00

Drillers and Blasters For Surface Mining
Average Hours Worked (per week):   62.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $33.04
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $94,475.00

Elementary School Teachers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   34.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $42.98
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $74,679.00

Farmers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $23.72
Overall Average Salary (annual)*, Alberta:   $55,776.00

Executive Assistants
Average Hours Worked (per week):   37.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $32.59
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $62,411.00

Geologists, Geochemists and Geophysicists
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $56.11
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $114,137.00

Heavy Equipment Operators
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.1
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $31.92
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,543.00

Janitors
Average Hours Worked (per week):   33.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $18.45
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $33,370.00

Librarians
Average Hours Worked (per week):   35
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $32.77
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $62,039.00

Ministers of Religion
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $28.82
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $57,168.00

Oil and Gas Well Drillers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $34.94
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $90,511.00

Pharmacists
Average Hours Worked (per week):   36.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $49.49
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $92,677.00

Petroleum Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $52.41
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $107,484.00

Nurses
Average Hours Worked (per week):   28.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $42.60
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $63,922.00

Human Resources Specialist
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.4
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $37.71
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $75,443.00

Taxi Drivers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $16.21
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $31,788.00

University Professors
Average Hours Worked (per week):   44.1
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $56.92
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $122,805.00

 

The highest paying jobs in the Alberta oil patch :

 

21. Occupational Health and Safety Advisor and Officer
a. Occupational health and safety advisors facilitate the development, implementation and maintenance of workplace safety programs.
Occupational Health and Safety Officer
b. Occupational health and safety officers visit places of employment to detect unsafe or unhealthy working conditions, and ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing workplace safety.
According to the provincial government, on average, they make as much as $75,129 per year.

20. Land Surveyor
Land surveyors plan, direct and conduct legal surveys to determine and interpret the location of boundaries, buildings, structures and other natural or human-made features on, over or under the surface of the earth.
According to the provincial government, on average, they make as much as $79,097 per year.

19. Manufacturing Engineer
Manufacturing engineers design, implement, direct and co-ordinate manufacturing system materials and processes to achieve the most efficient, cost effective and high quality production possible in a safe and environmentally responsible manner.
Also Known As: Engineer, Logistics Manager, Professional Engineer
On average, they start around $80,547 per year.

18. Industrial Engineer
Industrial engineers determine the most effective ways for an organization to use its basic resources: people, machines, materials, money and time.
Also Known As: Engineer, Logistics Manager, Professional Engineer
According to the government, they make an average of $80,547 per year.

17. Power Engineer
Power engineers supervise, operate and maintain machinery and boilers that provide steam, power, heat, refrigeration and other utility services to industrial and commercial facilities.
On average, they make as much as $80,735 per year.

16. Refinery and Upgrader Process Operator
Refinery and upgrader process operators are responsible for the day to day operations of oil refineries and upgraders.
Also Known As: Bitumen Extraction Plant Operator, Bitumen Upgrading Plant Operator, Oil Refinery Process Operator, Upgrader Process Operator
On average, they can earn as much as $81,339 per year.

15. Oil Pipeline Operators and Maintenance Workers
Oil pipeline operators and maintenance workers monitor and conduct the day to day operations of oil pipelines and associated facilities.
Also Known As: Equipment Operator, Gauger, Tank Farm Operator.
They can make, on average, as much as $81,339 per year.

14. Oil Pipeline Control Centre Operator
Oil pipeline control centre operators use sophisticated computerized equipment to monitor and control pipeline activities for large regions (for example, all of Alberta and British Columbia) from one centralized control centre.
On average, they can make as much as $81,339 per year.

13. Gas Plant Operator
Gas plant operators control automated processes that convert raw natural gas into forms that can be used by consumers.
On average, they can make as much as $81,339 per year.

12. Gas Pipeline Operators and Maintenance Workers
Gas pipeline operators and maintenance workers monitor the day to day operations of meter and compressor stations essential to the distribution and smooth flow of gas through pipelines.
Also Known As: Control Room Operator, Gas Compressor Operator
They can make on average $81,339 per year.

11. Oil and Gas Production Accountant
Oil and gas production accountants track and analyze production data, calculate revenue and royalties associated with properties owned by oil companies, and ensure reporting requirements are met.
On average, they make as much as $81,135 per year.

10. Field Production Operator
Field production operators are responsible for the initial separation processes or the special treatment required to ensure that impurities such as water, gas and sediments are removed from oil and gas in the field. Once separated, the oil or gas is transported by pipeline to refineries, gas plants or markets.
On average they make $81,622 per year.

9. Chemical Engineer
Chemical engineers conduct research; develop and optimize processes; design and select equipment; and provide technical and management services for plants that convert raw materials into a wide range of end products (for example, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, food products, fuels, plastics, metals).
Can make on average $103,425 per year.

8. Petroleum Engineer
Petroleum engineers are involved in the exploration and development of oil and gas. They apply the principles of geology, physics, chemistry and engineering sciences to the recovery of petroleum and natural gas from conventional reservoirs and oil sands.
Average salary per year is $106,000.

7. Hydrologist
Hydrologists study the occurrence, distribution, circulation and properties of water in the atmosphere, on the Earth’s surface, and in soil and underlying rocks.
On average, they make as much as $110,747 per year.

6. Geologist
Geologists apply their knowledge of the Earth’s crust in exploring for minerals and hydrocarbons (for example, oil and gas), developing resources for production, building engineering foundations and stable slopes, and finding and evaluating ground water supplies. They make an average of $110,747 per year.

5. Exploration Geophysicist
Geophysicists use the principles of physics, mathematics and geology to study the surface and internal composition of the earth. Exploration geophysicists look for oil, natural gas, water and minerals for commercial and environmental projects.
On Average, they make as much as $110,747 per year.

4. Geotechnical Engineer
Geotechnical engineers assess the natural foundations for engineering projects that are supported by rock or soil. They plan and supervise geological data acquisition and analysis, and prepare engineering designs, reports and recommendations.
On average, they make as much as $111,784 per year.

3. Geomatics Engineer
Geomatics engineers gather, model, analyze and manage spatially referenced data (information identified according to location).
On average, they make as much as $164,400 per year.

2. Snubbing Services Operators and Supervisors
Snubbing services operators and supervisors insert and remove drill pipe, tubing and specialized equipment into and from oil and gas wells when blowout preventers are closed to contain well pressure.
Incomes for snubbing services operators and supervisors range from $60,000 a year to $180,000 a year (2009 estimate).

1. Drilling and Service Rig Managers
Oil and gas well drilling and service rig managers supervise large crews of specialized workers on drilling and service rigs.
Drilling rig managers typically are paid a day rate. Depending on location and hours of service, service rig managers may be paid a day rate or an hourly rate. A drilling rig manager who works 200 days a year could realize potential earnings from $175,000 and $250,000 a year (2009 estimate). A service rig manager, who is not required to travel and work away from home in the same way a drilling rig manager is expected to, will earn somewhat less.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Employment hotbeds in Canada.

Has Canada’s economic power shifted to the west? Are all the best jobs in Alberta and Saskatchewan? Some people would say yes — and with good reason. Earlier this year, the Conference Board of Canada projected that Calgary (pictured), Edmonton, Regina and Saskatoon would post the strongest economic growth in Canada in 2012. There’s strong international demand for their natural resources, and some locals are reaping the benefits. Further, the government of Saskatchewan is only one of two provincial governments expected to post a budget surplus in the 2011-2012 fiscal year. So things are looking pretty rosy in the Prairies.

But just how good is Western Canada for jobs? What about the rest of the country? MoneySense has crunched numbers on 190 Canadian cities in order to find out which are the best for employment. See if your city cracked our top 10.

For our full methodology on how we crunched out numbers, click here.

10. Grande Prairie, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 28
Population growth: 152
Household income: 11
Discretionary income: 14
Average house price: 112
Average time to buy: 25
Doctors per 1,000: 106
Health professionals: 123
Transit: 109

Grande Prairie only finished 95th in our overall rankings, but when it comes to jobs, this mid-sized city in western Alberta is a frontrunner. Its residents have the 11th highest household incomes in the country out of the 190 cities that we surveyed. Like many of its Albertan neighbours, Grande Prairie is reliant on the oil and gas, forestry and agriculture industries. This city is also a major transportation hub in the Peace River Country and is located on the CANAMEX trade route, which links Canada with the United States and Mexico.

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9. Canmore, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 5
Population growth: 110
Household income: 6
Discretionary income: 3
Average house price: 186
Average time to buy: 161
Doctors per 1,000: 7
Health professionals: 49
Transit: 158

Canmore certainly benefits from its proximity to Banff National Park, which attracts tourists year-round. That means jobs are plentiful in the recreation, food and beverage, and hospitality sectors. In fact, out of our top 10 places for jobs, Canmore has the lowest unemployment rate and the second highest household income. But on the opposite side of the spectrum, Canmore has some of the least affordable housing in the entire country.

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8. Burlington, Ont.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 38
Population growth: 17
Household income: 20
Discretionary income: 29
Average house price: 153
Average time to buy: 105
Doctors per 1,000: 54
Health professionals: 122
Transit: 37

Burlington has the distinction of being the only city in Ontario on our jobs list. Located on the western edge of Lake Ontario, Burlington is ideally situated for people who’d like to commute to either Hamilton or the Great Toronto Area. It’s no wonder that Burlington’s population growth is booming. According to the government of Ontario, the majority of the province’s population increase over the next 25 years will come from new immigrants. Many of them will undoubtedly wind up in Burlington.

7. Lethbridge, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 10
Population growth: 71
Household income: 61
Discretionary income: 20
Average house price: 94
Average time to buy: 70
Doctors per 1,000: 130
Health professionals: 34
Transit: 92

Lethbridge lays claim to the most affordable housing amongst cities on our top 10 list. And when it comes to work, Lethbridge has the 10th lowest unemployment rate in the entire country. According to Economic Development Lethbridge, a not-for-profit organization, there are 48 firms in the city employing more than 100 people, many of which are in the public sector. Those organizations employ roughly 41 per cent of the city’s workforce.

6. Regina, Sask.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 9
Population growth: 1
Household income: 43
Discretionary income: 81
Average house price: 104
Average time to buy: 61
Doctors per 1,000: 73
Health professionals: 51
Transit: 57

People are rushing to Regina, which currently ranks number one in our population growth category. The city enjoys a low unemployment rate and its economy is driven by the oil and gas, potash and agricultural sectors. In January, the Conference Board of Canada projected that Regina’s economy would expand by 2.9 per cent in 2012. That’s a slowdown from last year’s numbers, but still leaves Regina placing fourth in economic growth amongst Canadian CMAs (Census Metropolitan Areas).

5. Edmonton, Alta

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 33
Population growth: 68
Household income: 40
Discretionary income: 22
Average house price: 134
Average time to buy: 106
Doctors per 1,000: 46
Health professionals: 41
Transit: 23

Edmonton is yet another economic powerhouse in the Prairies and the city benefits from being the closest urban centre to the Alberta oilsands. But it’s not all oil and energy in Edmonton. A good portion of the city’s workforce, for instance, is employed in the public sector. Edmonton is also home to the University of Alberta, which is one of the country’s finest places for post-secondary education. On the U of A campus you’ll find the National Institute for Nanotechnology, which has a business office that assists local nanotechnology firms.

4. Calgary, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 42
Population growth: 95
Household income: 8
Discretionary income: 7
Average house price: 164
Average time to buy: 70
Doctors per 1,000: 59
Health professionals: 98
Transit: 11

On average, Calgarians are making more money than residents of Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal, and the city boasts a lower unemployment rate than all three. Calgarians also have more leftover cash to save, spend and invest. So it comes as no surprise that Calgary has emerged as an economic power in Western Canada. And it turns out the rest of the world has noticed as well. In January, the Brookings Institution, a non-profit public policy organization in the United States, ranked Calgary as Canada’s leading economic performer on a list of worldwide metropolitan areas.

3. St. Albert, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 22
Population growth: 31
Household income: 9
Discretionary income: 10
Average house price: 173
Average time to buy: 130
Doctors per 1,000: 46
Health professionals: 15
Transit: 48

St. Albert enjoys the benefits of being close to Edmonton, though its residents easily outrank Edmontonians in average household income and discretionary income. The city also has the distinction of employing the highest percentage of health professionals in the general population amongst cities in our top 10. In the next couple years, the City of St. Albert is hoping to lure more tourists and establish its moniker as ‘the Botanical Arts City.’

2. Red Deer, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 17
Population growth: 17
Household income: 31
Discretionary income: 11
Average house price: 119
Average time to buy: 58
Doctors per 1,000: 72
Health professionals: 42
Transit: 64

Much like Burlington, Red Deer benefits from its proximity to two large cities — in this case, Edmonton and Calgary, both of which take roughly 90 minutes to reach by car. However, Red Deer outranks its high-profile neighbours with more affordable housing, ideal population growth and a better employment rate. According to Red Deer Region Economic Development, 90 per cent of land in the region is dedicated to agricultural production.

1. Strathcona County, Alta.

Rankings out of 190 cities:
Low unemployment: 17
Population growth: 85
Household income: 4
Discretionary income: 13
Average house price: 152
Average time to buy: 35
Doctors per 1,000: 46
Health professionals: 38
Transit: 69

Strathcona County is yet another prosperous city in the Edmonton area. So why does it rank No. 1? For starters, Strathcona County locals make the most money in our top 10 and the unemployment rate is enviable. A good portion of its workforce commutes to Edmonton for jobs in health care and manufacturing. East Edmonton and Strathcona also count several industrial employers within their boundaries, including Imperial Oil, Enbridge, Suncor and Shell Canada. In other words, there is no shortage of major corporate employers to keep thousands of Strathcona County locals in well-paying jobs.

B.C. finance minister Kevin Falcon suggested the plan, which a Liberal MLA says ‘just makes sense.’ ‘Solve two problems at once’

The B.C. government is floating a proposal to fly people on social assistance north and give them accommodation and training to fill vacant jobs in the booming oil and gas sector.

Finance Minister Kevin Falcon first suggested the plan at a business meeting in Kamloops on Tuesday.

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