Archives for posts with tag: Alberta

 
Want to see the earning potential of certain occupations in Alberta?
Read the list for average hourly pay and salaries for 30 common jobs.

Hotel Managers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   42.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $24.24
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $52,207.0

Aerospace Engineer
Average Hours Worked (per week):   37.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $54.82
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $106,900.00

Ambulance Attendants
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $30.35
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $65,436.00

Architects
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $38.79
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,693.00

Bartenders
Average Hours Worked (per week):   28.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $11.37
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $17,164.00

Bricklayers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $40.37
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $84,525.00

Civil Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $46.11
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $92,054.00

Social Workers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   32.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $40.24
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $67,175.00

Police Officers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $72.06
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $147,745.00

Computer Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $44.86
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $88,975.00

Mechanic Trades
Average Hours Worked (per week):   41.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $36.08
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,076.00

Corrections Officers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $31.40
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $63,285.00

Crane Operators
Average Hours Worked (per week):   42.9
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $35.90
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $80,626.00

Drillers and Blasters For Surface Mining
Average Hours Worked (per week):   62.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $33.04
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $94,475.00

Elementary School Teachers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   34.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $42.98
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $74,679.00

Farmers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $23.72
Overall Average Salary (annual)*, Alberta:   $55,776.00

Executive Assistants
Average Hours Worked (per week):   37.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $32.59
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $62,411.00

Geologists, Geochemists and Geophysicists
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.2
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $56.11
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $114,137.00

Heavy Equipment Operators
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.1
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $31.92
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $77,543.00

Janitors
Average Hours Worked (per week):   33.6
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $18.45
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $33,370.00

Librarians
Average Hours Worked (per week):   35
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $32.77
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $62,039.00

Ministers of Religion
Average Hours Worked (per week):   38.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $28.82
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $57,168.00

Oil and Gas Well Drillers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   47.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $34.94
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $90,511.00

Pharmacists
Average Hours Worked (per week):   36.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $49.49
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $92,677.00

Petroleum Engineers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.5
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $52.41
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $107,484.00

Nurses
Average Hours Worked (per week):   28.8
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $42.60
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $63,922.00

Human Resources Specialist
Average Hours Worked (per week):   39.4
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $37.71
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $75,443.00

Taxi Drivers
Average Hours Worked (per week):   40.3
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $16.21
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $31,788.00

University Professors
Average Hours Worked (per week):   44.1
Overall Average Wage (per hour):   $56.92
Overall Average Salary (annual), Alberta:   $122,805.00

 

The highest paying jobs in the Alberta oil patch :

 

21. Occupational Health and Safety Advisor and Officer
a. Occupational health and safety advisors facilitate the development, implementation and maintenance of workplace safety programs.
Occupational Health and Safety Officer
b. Occupational health and safety officers visit places of employment to detect unsafe or unhealthy working conditions, and ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing workplace safety.
According to the provincial government, on average, they make as much as $75,129 per year.

20. Land Surveyor
Land surveyors plan, direct and conduct legal surveys to determine and interpret the location of boundaries, buildings, structures and other natural or human-made features on, over or under the surface of the earth.
According to the provincial government, on average, they make as much as $79,097 per year.

19. Manufacturing Engineer
Manufacturing engineers design, implement, direct and co-ordinate manufacturing system materials and processes to achieve the most efficient, cost effective and high quality production possible in a safe and environmentally responsible manner.
Also Known As: Engineer, Logistics Manager, Professional Engineer
On average, they start around $80,547 per year.

18. Industrial Engineer
Industrial engineers determine the most effective ways for an organization to use its basic resources: people, machines, materials, money and time.
Also Known As: Engineer, Logistics Manager, Professional Engineer
According to the government, they make an average of $80,547 per year.

17. Power Engineer
Power engineers supervise, operate and maintain machinery and boilers that provide steam, power, heat, refrigeration and other utility services to industrial and commercial facilities.
On average, they make as much as $80,735 per year.

16. Refinery and Upgrader Process Operator
Refinery and upgrader process operators are responsible for the day to day operations of oil refineries and upgraders.
Also Known As: Bitumen Extraction Plant Operator, Bitumen Upgrading Plant Operator, Oil Refinery Process Operator, Upgrader Process Operator
On average, they can earn as much as $81,339 per year.

15. Oil Pipeline Operators and Maintenance Workers
Oil pipeline operators and maintenance workers monitor and conduct the day to day operations of oil pipelines and associated facilities.
Also Known As: Equipment Operator, Gauger, Tank Farm Operator.
They can make, on average, as much as $81,339 per year.

14. Oil Pipeline Control Centre Operator
Oil pipeline control centre operators use sophisticated computerized equipment to monitor and control pipeline activities for large regions (for example, all of Alberta and British Columbia) from one centralized control centre.
On average, they can make as much as $81,339 per year.

13. Gas Plant Operator
Gas plant operators control automated processes that convert raw natural gas into forms that can be used by consumers.
On average, they can make as much as $81,339 per year.

12. Gas Pipeline Operators and Maintenance Workers
Gas pipeline operators and maintenance workers monitor the day to day operations of meter and compressor stations essential to the distribution and smooth flow of gas through pipelines.
Also Known As: Control Room Operator, Gas Compressor Operator
They can make on average $81,339 per year.

11. Oil and Gas Production Accountant
Oil and gas production accountants track and analyze production data, calculate revenue and royalties associated with properties owned by oil companies, and ensure reporting requirements are met.
On average, they make as much as $81,135 per year.

10. Field Production Operator
Field production operators are responsible for the initial separation processes or the special treatment required to ensure that impurities such as water, gas and sediments are removed from oil and gas in the field. Once separated, the oil or gas is transported by pipeline to refineries, gas plants or markets.
On average they make $81,622 per year.

9. Chemical Engineer
Chemical engineers conduct research; develop and optimize processes; design and select equipment; and provide technical and management services for plants that convert raw materials into a wide range of end products (for example, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, food products, fuels, plastics, metals).
Can make on average $103,425 per year.

8. Petroleum Engineer
Petroleum engineers are involved in the exploration and development of oil and gas. They apply the principles of geology, physics, chemistry and engineering sciences to the recovery of petroleum and natural gas from conventional reservoirs and oil sands.
Average salary per year is $106,000.

7. Hydrologist
Hydrologists study the occurrence, distribution, circulation and properties of water in the atmosphere, on the Earth’s surface, and in soil and underlying rocks.
On average, they make as much as $110,747 per year.

6. Geologist
Geologists apply their knowledge of the Earth’s crust in exploring for minerals and hydrocarbons (for example, oil and gas), developing resources for production, building engineering foundations and stable slopes, and finding and evaluating ground water supplies. They make an average of $110,747 per year.

5. Exploration Geophysicist
Geophysicists use the principles of physics, mathematics and geology to study the surface and internal composition of the earth. Exploration geophysicists look for oil, natural gas, water and minerals for commercial and environmental projects.
On Average, they make as much as $110,747 per year.

4. Geotechnical Engineer
Geotechnical engineers assess the natural foundations for engineering projects that are supported by rock or soil. They plan and supervise geological data acquisition and analysis, and prepare engineering designs, reports and recommendations.
On average, they make as much as $111,784 per year.

3. Geomatics Engineer
Geomatics engineers gather, model, analyze and manage spatially referenced data (information identified according to location).
On average, they make as much as $164,400 per year.

2. Snubbing Services Operators and Supervisors
Snubbing services operators and supervisors insert and remove drill pipe, tubing and specialized equipment into and from oil and gas wells when blowout preventers are closed to contain well pressure.
Incomes for snubbing services operators and supervisors range from $60,000 a year to $180,000 a year (2009 estimate).

1. Drilling and Service Rig Managers
Oil and gas well drilling and service rig managers supervise large crews of specialized workers on drilling and service rigs.
Drilling rig managers typically are paid a day rate. Depending on location and hours of service, service rig managers may be paid a day rate or an hourly rate. A drilling rig manager who works 200 days a year could realize potential earnings from $175,000 and $250,000 a year (2009 estimate). A service rig manager, who is not required to travel and work away from home in the same way a drilling rig manager is expected to, will earn somewhat less.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

These vintage posters bring us back to a simpler time in Alberta — when vacations were long, luxurious and had far fewer tourists.

Vintage Ads 3
Vintage Ads 1
Vintage Ads 2

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

Stupid to the Last Drop: How Alberta Is Bringing Environmental Armageddon to Canada (And Doesn’t Seem to Care)

 

 
As Marsden describes it, the industry is so damaging and irrational that you’d think someone would slam the brakes.

Instead, projects are rubber-stamped and supported with generous tax breaks and lax oversight. Through the stories of families sickened or financially devastated by polluted water or air, Marsden describes how the government and regulators ignore victims and trample opponents.

In fact, he says, the oil sands, combined with Alberta’s growing mania for extracting natural gas from coal seams by injecting toxic chemicals into the ground – thereby poisoning some of the dwindling supply of drinking water – threaten to create a parched, deforested, polluted wasteland. “At the end of the day you will have a pot of gold with no place to live.”

“Why are Albertans so stupid?” William Marsden asks in his provocative new book

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
A video that was focused on a “rubbing tree” visited by a variety of wildlife through day and night

It provides incredible insight into animal activity when humans weren’t around.

 

 
It looks like some kind of dance. I guess their itch just got un-bearable!

Despite their reputation as territorial hot-heads, bears in the wild actually possess a complex social structure that can make them seem downright charming. Meeting around a prized scratching post for some much-needed itch relief offers the animals an opportunity to familiarize themselves, easing tension while forming important kinship bonds

Sometimes, bears will even help each other out with those hard-to-reach places.

 

 
Among group animals, building a healthy social network means grooming. Though it can take on many forms, these kindly gestures of camaraderie serve an important role in the building of relationships, maintenance of good hygiene, and easing of tensions between members of a pack — and when done properly, it can be downright adorable.

http://www.treehugger.com/natural-sciences/bear-cubs-licking-each-others-ears.html
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
We want young Albertans to think about voting strategically. Find out who in your riding has the best chance of winning against the Wildrose Party – even if it’s the PCs. We’re not affiliated with any political party – we just know who we DON’T want running our province
 
http://www.ineverthoughtidvotepc.com/
 
Here are some reasons to keep Wildrose out:
Their “conscience rights” proposal, which would allow doctors and marriage commissioners to refuse services based on their own morals:
Wildrose Party’s idea of “conscience rights” is discriminatory
 
Candidate Ron Leech, who says being white gives him an advantage
 
Candidate Allen Hunsperger, who says gay people will “suffer the rest of eternity in the lake of fire, hell”
 
Their plan to write $300 checks to all Albertans from budget surpluses – instead of investing in the province
http://www.calgaryherald.com/Dani+Dollars/6407726/story.html
 
 
 

Alta. Wildrose leader has doubts about science on climate change
 

Smith dodges climate change questions
Wildrose Party Leader suggested climate change science inconclusive

Wildrose Party Leader Danielle Smith is refusing to clarify whether she doubts that global warming is being caused by human activities.
Read more….
 
Wildrose leader under fire for questioning science behind climate change
 
Danielle Smith Wildrose views on moral issues
 

 
The two minute video you need to watch before you vote on April 23rd.

Responses from Wildrose Leader Danielle Smith on important moral issues from May 2011. The full 9 minute interview is found here:
 

 
Staples: Does Danielle Smith like Edmonton? A fair and important question
 
Why B.C. voters should worry about Danielle Smith and the Wildrose party in Alberta
 
 

The province’s election issues are the some of the most difficult this era and could unleash vast social, political change. The facts

Redford slammed in debate

Grits force out Tory salaries

The Parkland Institute claims oil sands revenues have fallen way below their targets. What Albertans have received since 1997
 

Alta. NDP to raise royalties
The NDP said it will hike royalties and force all new oilsands projects to upgrade recovered bitumen in Alberta.

Wildrose promises cash
Alberta’s Wildrose party is promising free oil money for all if it wins the election on April 23.

Party issues surplus challenge
Alberta Wildrose leader Danielle Smith is challenging opponents who don’t like her “Dani-dollars” petro-giveback to explain how they’ll use any future budget surpluses.